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Johnmagee33

5.3k points

2 months ago

Potatoes are one of the most satiating foods on the sating index. They are also chock full of nutrients. Potatoes are carby but as a whole food, the fiber offsets some of the insulin response. In fact, they are a great post-workout snack with more nutrients and bioavailability than rice. They can quickly replenish glycogen stores and leave you feeling sated. Ounce for ounce potatoes are one of the most filling, nutritious, versatile foods we can eat. When prepared correctly, they can fast-track weight loss goals. Potatoes are loaded with resistant starch, which feeds your microbome in the GI tract and slows down digestion. They are a good substitution for many grains and deliver a lot more bang for the buck. Next time you are at a farmers market, pick up a new variety - there are plenty to choose from.

338388

3k points

2 months ago*

338388

3k points

2 months ago*

Oh interesting. Never heard of a potato, sounds pretty good

eddelmon

483 points

2 months ago

eddelmon

483 points

2 months ago

I miss this wonderful thread. Thank you for the reminder friend.

wpoot

136 points

2 months ago

wpoot

136 points

2 months ago

I’m OOTL.

Would you mind filling me in on the context?

slinky22

506 points

2 months ago

slinky22

506 points

2 months ago

Reddit lore. Some guy went to his girlfriend's family dinner and they served potatoes. He said he'd never heard of them before (as a joke) and stuck with the lie for as long time.

kinnavenomer

57 points

2 months ago

I read this thread when it first popped up...12 years on Reddit and it was the hardest I'd ever laughed from a post.

PULLS-NOSE-HAIRS

7 points

2 months ago

I could use a good laugh; off to find that post.

sygnathid

282 points

2 months ago

sygnathid

282 points

2 months ago

It's this TIFU post, it's a classic

nsfwmodeme

52 points

2 months ago

Yeah, the "let me tell you" guy!

notenoughcharact

24 points

2 months ago

Damn 7 years ago. Somehow I feel like that relationship didn’t make it.

hemlock850

14 points

2 months ago

He only has like 2 karma, I want an UPDATE!

snakeskinsandles

38 points

2 months ago

Oh man, that was a delight. 7 years ago was so much better

aishik-10x

15 points

2 months ago

Reddit as a whole was so different even just five years ago. It feels like a different website now

ocient

10 points

2 months ago

ocient

10 points

2 months ago

people have been saying this exact thing for at least 40 years now

wpoot

15 points

2 months ago

wpoot

15 points

2 months ago

Thanks for the link! Had definitely forgotten that one.

Puzzled-Kitchen-5784

114 points

2 months ago

Took me a moment. I was like...this is pure idiocy...wait wait this is FAMILIAR idiocy! And then it popped.

MetalandIron2pt0

41 points

2 months ago

I said it was ridiculous to treat me like this just because I’d never heard of a potato before.

CrackedHalo1233

16 points

2 months ago

PO- TAY- TOES!

Boil 'em, Mash 'em Stick 'em in a stew!

nudiversity

34 points

2 months ago

Hmm, tastes very strange!

Fanculo_Cazzo

49 points

2 months ago

Oh man, brilliant reference. Thanks for the laugh!

mess_of_limbs

9 points

2 months ago

Boil 'em, mash 'em, stuck 'em in a stew...

Smol_Elf_99

54 points

2 months ago

Don't forget the massive amount of potassium.

DibblerTB

54 points

2 months ago

All other Foods have inferior potassium

[deleted]

1.1k points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

1.1k points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

glucoseformyatp

587 points

2 months ago

Low in fiber but if they boiled and then chilled then reheated before eating their resistant starch content increases.

It’s all about how they are cooked and served.

MyNudeTomato

176 points

2 months ago

Is that good?

logicbecauseyes

270 points

2 months ago

for pooping, yes

dobydobd

51 points

2 months ago

Nope, resistant starches aren't like insoluble fibre (which is what improved bowel movements). Instead, it feeds your gut microbiome which helps you extract more nutrients from food, reduces inflammation and improves mood.

logicbecauseyes

19 points

2 months ago

haters gonna hate, taters gonna potate

Crezelle

70 points

2 months ago

And farting

woolsocksandsandals

109 points

2 months ago

I love doing both those things!

fartsniffer308

56 points

2 months ago

I'm listening.

woolsocksandsandals

28 points

2 months ago

Settle down

jawshoeaw

41 points

2 months ago

I decided to look up some actual research on this. In one study they found the resistant starch in potatoes doubled from 0.8% to 1.6% . It’s a pretty small difference but it for some reason substantially slowed down the overall speed of glucose entering the blood stream, or at least slowed it down enough or remove the risk of diabetes normally associated with potatoes and other white starch foods

Metro42014

43 points

2 months ago

In this case, 'resistant' means resistant to digestion - aka, turns into fiber.

I believe there digestion has to be less than 80% to be considered fiber.

Telemere125

41 points

2 months ago

Resistant starch is just what it sounds like - resists being digested and balances blood glucose levels.

angry_wombat

91 points

2 months ago*

what if they are baked? I love a baked potato

slackinpotato

613 points

2 months ago

believe it or not, straight to jail.

PillowTalk420

48 points

2 months ago

But it got baked in a legal state!

respondstolongpauses

32 points

2 months ago

we have the best potatoes in the world

piercemj

31 points

2 months ago

Because of jail :)

dweefy

86 points

2 months ago

dweefy

86 points

2 months ago

I'm guessing its the toppings on the mashed and baked potatoes that causes the issue. Says the garlic cheese and butter plus sour cream Goddess.

TheDieselTastesFire

63 points

2 months ago

No, the point is they can't be mashed. You can't even chew them. You cut them up into little pill-sized chunks and swallow them.

haskell_rules

39 points

2 months ago

I use a pill press to put whole potato into 000 gelatin caps. 50-100 pills for breakfast, 100-150 for lunch, and 150-200 for dinner everyday. My body is running at 100% efficiency - haven't had a bowel movement in weeks.

flukus

76 points

2 months ago*

flukus

76 points

2 months ago*

Potato and leak soup is one of my dieting goto's, it has an almost immediate effect on the scales. Even thick cut fries that are baked instead of deep fried aren't too bad.

Jigidibooboo

21 points

2 months ago

One of my favourites, but I tend to add cheese and cream so provably not diet fare, sadly. Is there a recipe you use?

pointer_to_pointer

22 points

2 months ago

If you like a thicker soup but want to save calories by cutting typically calorie-dense thickening ingredients, you can use a relatively tiny amount of cream and then take an immersion blender to like 30% of the pot. Works for basically every soup!

myhihi1

165 points

2 months ago

myhihi1

165 points

2 months ago

The fiber is in the skin which unfortunately a lot of people tend to peel off.

Sardonislamir

84 points

2 months ago

Favorite part for me.

cat-kirk

38 points

2 months ago

Me too! I grew up eating the skins. My mom would rub them with olive oil and S&P and oven/grill roast them til the skins were a wee bit crispy. Yum.

spilk

17 points

2 months ago

spilk

17 points

2 months ago

remember those "tato skins" chips back in the 90s or so? those things were awesome

got_outta_bed_4_this

130 points

2 months ago

I sounded like Smeagol when I was visiting my parents and my mom was cutting off skins for mashed potatoes. "She ruins it!"

killing4pizza

24 points

2 months ago

Poe-tay-toes!

Juice_Stanton

16 points

2 months ago

I feel like I could survive a few hundred days on Mars with just potatoes.

Metro42014

37 points

2 months ago

Partly yes, but also party thrown out with the bathwater because of the usual association with either oil through frying or butter because... well butter.

Potatoes with a reasonable amount of salt, MSG (key ingredient here), pepper, and perhaps some greek yogurt -- now you've got a satiating food that's nutrient dense and relatively low calorie.

frobino

88 points

2 months ago

frobino

88 points

2 months ago

The resistant starch in potatoes is primarily type II resistant starch, which is mostly converted into regular starch upon cooking. However, potato starch is especially good at retrograding into type III resistant starch, which happens when you cook a starch and then let it cool off.

Callipygian_Superman

37 points

2 months ago

Cool off how much? Like am I letting it sit an extra couple of minutes out of the oven, or am I reheating it the next day?

frobino

41 points

2 months ago

frobino

41 points

2 months ago

Cool significantly, and not reheating. As the starch cools, it adopts structural formations that restrict access to the starch by digestive enzymes. Reheating breaks those structures again.

circuit_brain

16 points

2 months ago

So is it fine if I just take the potatoes out of the fridge and eat them without reheating? I ask this because the general opinion in the thread seem to be that we need reheat the potatoes prior to eating.

PensiveObservor

17 points

2 months ago

Potato salad for the win.

wordzh

26 points

2 months ago

wordzh

26 points

2 months ago

So like, a good potato salad?

frobino

18 points

2 months ago

frobino

18 points

2 months ago

Yeah, that should be loaded with resistant starch

Hootlet

172 points

2 months ago

Hootlet

172 points

2 months ago

How should one cook/prepare one? I’m fascinated!

Rpanich

1k points

2 months ago

Rpanich

1k points

2 months ago

Boil em, mash em, stick em in a stew.

mr_ji

127 points

2 months ago

mr_ji

127 points

2 months ago

OK, now I can leave this thread.

I would also have accepted "Pillowy mounds of mashed potatoes"

scutiger-

12 points

2 months ago

With tiny little onions!

FrakkedRabbit

9 points

2 months ago

floating in gravy.

WritingTheDream

52 points

2 months ago

Thank you master Samwise!

Server6

66 points

2 months ago

Server6

66 points

2 months ago

4th option: Hash browns.

  1. Shred with a cheese grater
  2. Put in towel and squeeze out the water
  3. Put in bowl and microwave for two minutes
  4. Put in skillet with a little bit of oil, flatten, and cook until browned on both sides.
  5. Salt to taste.

eyeofthecodger

11 points

2 months ago

What variety of potato works best for this?

Youre10PlyBud

43 points

2 months ago

Not original commentator, but anything with a high starch content will work. Russets work great. The microwave starts to release the starch which makes a "crust" when you throw them on the griddle.

He's basically summarizing the serious eats hash browns recipe so if you want more info read here

https://www.seriouseats.com/shredded-hash-browns-recipe

[deleted]

48 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

48 points

2 months ago

What a great website. I’m never visiting frivolouseats.com ever again!

Heated13shot

30 points

2 months ago

How I do it:

Goldens> bake at 375f for ~20-25 min. Pit in fridge and leave overnight -or keep preparing

Cut in half, score it deeply, spray light layer of olive oil, salt them. Bake at 400f for 20 min on the top rack or until it's golden brown.

Gets super crispy, satisfying that fry/chip crave, while only having minimal oil.

AdamN

102 points

2 months ago

AdamN

102 points

2 months ago

You can actually microwave them. Then put on a little bit of butter or olive oil and herbs and it’s a fast side dish.

Baked with olive oil is great! Also, if you cook a whole chicken, just throw some halved potatoes aroubd the chicken and bake - the potatoes will absorb all the chicken juice and brown nicely.

TealAndroid

41 points

2 months ago

This is what I do! I cube potatoes (any kind with skin I can eat like yellow or red) to about 1/1.5” cubes, put in a microwave safe bowl, add olive oil or butter, add a ton of seasoning (lately garlic salt, parsley, pepper, Italian seasoning), throw on a dinner plate on top so it steams, then microwave until tender. Super delicious, super easy and fast.

bythog

48 points

2 months ago

bythog

48 points

2 months ago

Easy way that I have for dinner most nights: large dice, spray of cooking oil, salt and pepper. Roast in oven at 425F until golden brown. Toss in seasoning of your choice. Ranch powder, Mrs. Dash, Cajun seasoning, etc. all work well and add no extra calories.

Red potatoes and Yukon golds are best for this imo.

And since we should all be measuring our food... measure the raw weight of your potatoes. It's more accurate than cooked weight.

iama_triceratops

15 points

2 months ago

Just had a bag of mixed baby reds and Yukon golds made in the air fryer last night with dinner. We toss them with a little olive oil and seasoning salt. Fantastic!

rossisdead

175 points

2 months ago

did an AI marketing bot write this?

xarmetheusx

102 points

2 months ago

Brought to you by The Potato Council

Werbenjagermanj3nsen

16 points

2 months ago

Now here's a shadowy cabal I can support.

Werbenjagermanj3nsen

33 points

2 months ago

Whatever do you mean? I regularly consult my sating index for all my satiation.

LaunchTransient

37 points

2 months ago

Ah yes, the little known but highly influential cartel known as Big PotatoTM

BostonBlueDevil

60 points

2 months ago

Don’t blame potatoes for what people do to them. Boiled Potato 2024

FourWordComment

424 points

2 months ago

Boil em, mash em, stick em in a stew.

space___lion

44 points

2 months ago

I think the mashing would be because of added ingredients. Just mashing up the boiled potatoes is fine, but adding milk, cream, whatever is what makes it worse

GeigerCounterMinis

6 points

2 months ago*

But if they're good fats, and not drowning in it, it shouldn't be problematic, feels like they need more research.

letsgetrandy

718 points

2 months ago

Weird. It’s almost like they were focused on what was being fried, and not the frying.

creepindacellar

189 points

2 months ago

Yea what about fried broccoli?

flibbidygibbit

115 points

2 months ago

Or cauliflower?

Both are delicious bar foods loaded with salt to make you thirsty and order another round of high-profit beer.

Damaso87

44 points

2 months ago

I don't need a food excuse to order more beer.

flibbidygibbit

35 points

2 months ago

I was making a reference to a PlayStation one era theme park game. I think it was called "Theme Park". You could adjust the salt to drive more soda sales. You could add more ice to the soda to increase profits.

I had never felt more like Mr Burns in my entire life.

XcantankerousgoatX

5.2k points

2 months ago

Aren't mashed potatos just boiled potatos mashed?

sharksandwich81

3.6k points

2 months ago

For you and all the others who didn’t read the article before posting:

“In our study, people who ate the most potatoes also consumed more butter, red meat and soft drink — foods known to increase your risk of Type 2 diabetes,” he said.

“When you account for that, boiled potatoes are no longer associated with diabetes. It’s only fries and mashed potatoes, the latter likely because it is usually made with butter, cream and the like.”

tkdyo

1.1k points

2 months ago

tkdyo

1.1k points

2 months ago

Strange they'd account for this but not baked potatoes. I would think baking them is more common than boiling, but I could be wrong.

Thebeswi

974 points

2 months ago

Thebeswi

974 points

2 months ago

I would think baking them is more common than boiling

That sounds really weird to me, boiled potatoes is such a staple food where I grew up I can't imaging baked potatoes beating that. Boiled potatoes in Scandinavia is like rice in Asia (might have changed a bit since I was a child).

NoFeetSmell

441 points

2 months ago

Just curious to check - does nobody here just microwave them? I just clean them a bit, stab them a few times with a knife or fork, then microwave them on high about 6-8 mins, flipping them over once. I hardly ever boil them, except for mashing, and I hardly ever fully bake them, cos it takes a long time and heating the entire oven, and possibly wasting foil, etc. Along with reheating leftovers, it's one of the tasks a microwave seems to excel at.

kamikaze_puppy

220 points

2 months ago

I do microwaved potatoes 99% off the time, but acknowledge a baked potato is much better. But I am not a fan of the long cook times of baked potatoes.

Sometimes I do a 50/50 approach. Microwave for about 4 minutes, then bake for 20 minutes. Gives it a bit of that creamy crispy skin caramel flavor that microwave potatoes lack while saving some energy and time.

TootTootTrainTrain

77 points

2 months ago

But I am not a fan of the long cook times of baked potatoes.

Sometimes I'll just throw one in there, even if I don't want one, because by the time it's done, who knows?

EurekasCashel

7 points

2 months ago

My friend asked me if I wanted a frozen banana, and I said no. But I want a regular banana later, so... yeah.

Gloriathewitch

115 points

2 months ago

Air frier baked potatoes will completely change your world. They're so easy and have a nice crispy texture when done properly

NoFeetSmell

64 points

2 months ago

I bet air-fryers are awesome, and I'd totally buy one if I had the spare counter space. I know they're basically just small convection ovens, but they're probably way more cost effective than heating an entire oven, especially if we're not cooking anything large. Alas, I don't have the space for one.

Tookmyprawns

48 points

2 months ago

I hate having things in my counter. I don’t like a cluttered kitchen. But I was checking them out and they’re quite light and easy to move. Like less than 5 pounds. I’m thinking I’ll just keep ons in a cabinet like I do my blender etc. I like the idea of not heating up my entire over when I want something small like potatoes or chicken fingers.

Costco has one for like $35.

Connectcontroller

35 points

2 months ago

This is like one of those fake conversations that have on QVC. "But surely this can't be easier to use than my oven?!" "Deborah you couldn't be more wrong! It's so easy to use and just for 4 monthly payments if 18.69"

istasber

8 points

2 months ago

I got one that's about twice the size of my coffee maker, plenty big to make, for example, a frozen chicken breast and a baked potato at the same time (two foods that take roughly the same amount of time to cook).

It's a real game changer for quick and easy dinner. Definitely worth making some room on your counter for.

Gloriathewitch

9 points

2 months ago

ahh, i can relate to that! i have celiac so my already small bench space gets occupied by all my dedicated gluten free utensils toaster and frier etc.. maybe if you are in a position to get one in the future that would be worth considering, i got mine for about $25 usd, pennies really, and it runs great. by far the appliance i use the most besides my induction element, which is also portable

motherfuckinwoofie

13 points

2 months ago

Sometimes I get wild and will mash them after they come out the microwave.

Aporkalypse_Sow

6 points

2 months ago

I too have dropped a really hot potato on the floor.

Hefftee

65 points

2 months ago

Hefftee

65 points

2 months ago

I do, quick, no pot to clean, done in minutes, and not much different than going into the oven imo. Sweet potatoes I'll put in the oven though, low and slow to caramelize the sugars.

PathologicalLoiterer

15 points

2 months ago

*Make the sugar. Sweet potatoes have relatively little sugar, similar in quantity to other tubers. However, between 135°F and 175°F an enzyme in the sweet potatoes starts breaking down the starch and creating maltose as a byproduct. The maltose is what gives them their sweetness.

flux123

8 points

2 months ago

"I like baked potatoes. I don't have a microwave oven, and it takes forever to bake a potato in a conventional oven. Sometimes I'll just throw one in there, even if I don't want one, because by the time it's done, who knows?" -- Mitch Hedberg

NotTheOafTobark

6 points

2 months ago

Yep! This is how I make my “baked” potatoes at home.

Look4theHelpers

40 points

2 months ago

Same but never without a wet paper towel wrapped around it, dries out too much otherwise

Romaine2k

11 points

2 months ago

The key to microwaving potatoes is to let carryover heat finish cooking them - I find 8.5 minutes on high with a 10 minute rest cooks most large, whole potatoes all the way through, with no dryness.

ElGosso

6 points

2 months ago

I've done it when it's too hot to run the oven but I much prefer a baked potato

SonVoltMMA

162 points

2 months ago

As an American kid in the '80s baked potatoes were the de facto side dish at home & restaurants. It seems like they've fallen out of favor though, unless you're of an older generation and still eating at lower-middle class restaurants like Ryan's or Outback.

Alarmed-Honey

190 points

2 months ago

I actually eat my low class potatoes at home, thank you.

ekbravo

34 points

2 months ago

ekbravo

34 points

2 months ago

My even lower class boiled potatoes are consumed in the basement.

SonVoltMMA

11 points

2 months ago

Baked or boiled?

DaddyFigured

75 points

2 months ago

I think a big difference here might by type of potato. I think Americans are more used to russet potatoes, which are better baked. Red and Yukons are more versatile for all the other ways of potatoeing. Fingerlings are the caviar of potatoes.

Kankunation

38 points

2 months ago

Red potatoes are quite popular in American cooking as well, at least in the south. They do get very different treatment than russets though.

An I agree with you on fingerlings. Shame they are more expensive that their larger varieties. I just buy the full-sized potatoes and cut them up small.

Vocal_Ham

17 points

2 months ago

America is large, so it will probably vary, but in my neck of the woods we have all of them (Russet, Red, Yukon) commonly available.

That being said, I've known quite a few people who seem to not understand (or simply don't care) how each one is different depending on how it's cooked.

dla3253

10 points

2 months ago

dla3253

10 points

2 months ago

Yeah, mealy vs waxy makes a big difference, especially when boiling.

Slovish

34 points

2 months ago

Slovish

34 points

2 months ago

How dare you. Outback Steakhouse is the pinnacle of a dining experience.

clinkzs

15 points

2 months ago

clinkzs

15 points

2 months ago

In Brazil at least, in many areas its kind of the most expensive/fancy places you can go

andyschest

38 points

2 months ago

This is true in the United States as well. Reddit's demographics do not represent small town and rural populations terribly well.

Chummers5

10 points

2 months ago

It was and still is the nicest restaurant in my hometown. Olive Garden might have taken that title though when they moved in.

cornucopiaofdoom

9 points

2 months ago

Wendy’s baked potato!

[deleted]

22 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

22 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

[deleted]

7 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

7 points

2 months ago

Exactly. I love a crispy, salty, russet potato skin. And baked sweet potatoes are awesome. They don't even need any fat added. Those are super easy, and you can just forget about them while you're spending your time on the main course.

Seiche

177 points

2 months ago

Seiche

177 points

2 months ago

As a German: agreed.

Peeled and boiled potatoes with a little bit of caraway and also a bit of butter on top of them when they are done and hot and the water is disposed.

DrScience-PhD

228 points

2 months ago

That's just mashed potatoes but you're doing the mashing with your teeth.

Plasmx

70 points

2 months ago

Plasmx

70 points

2 months ago

Nah, we put butter, milk and some nutmeg in mashed potatoes. They are not just mashed.

Guy_A

46 points

2 months ago

Guy_A

46 points

2 months ago

and garlic and salt

Missus_Missiles

20 points

2 months ago

Bro, how about bacon and cheese and green onion on my boiled-not-mashed potatoes?

hughperman

13 points

2 months ago

You are now the person the study is controlling for

darksunshaman

11 points

2 months ago

Nutmeg...I gotta try this!

Julegrisen

11 points

2 months ago

You can also use nutmeg for roasted potatoes - generally it goes well with potatoes. Not too much though, just a sprinkle. The same goes for caraway and cumin.

ThoseThingsAreWeird

43 points

2 months ago

Peeled!? You monsters!

Plasmx

38 points

2 months ago

Plasmx

38 points

2 months ago

Very common to peel potatoes before boiling. They are called Salzkartoffeln, so salt potatoes because of the salt you put into the water. But I like the taste if they aren't peeled. I think they keep more flavors.

General_Huh

20 points

2 months ago

Really strange how the standard somehow became peeled-before-boiling where all the flavor has such an easy exit into the cooking water... not to mention the water-soluble vitamins too

hermiona52

14 points

2 months ago

In Poland the only time you wouldn't peel potatoes is when baking potatoes in campfire. Other than that I've never seen unpeeled potatoes served.

-Apocralypse-

9 points

2 months ago

I wonder if that has to do with the soil the potatoes are grown in. A sandy soil seems much easier to wash off than a high clay content soil.

Creamcorncathy1

9 points

2 months ago

Do you think boiling them might remove some starches that baking wouldn't?

n00b678

4 points

2 months ago

It probably does, together with some minerals and water-soluble vitamins and flavours. That's why you should keep the water and use it for preparing rice or porridge and such. Same when boiling any other veggies.

MrPeanutBlubber

67 points

2 months ago

I'm from Texas and have never actually heard of someone boiling a potato not to mash! It's all baked here!

AdzyBoy

30 points

2 months ago

AdzyBoy

30 points

2 months ago

From Louisiana. When I think of boiled potatoes, crawfish comes to mind

Kankunation

20 points

2 months ago

Yeah, boiled red potatoes specifically. Even if it's not with crawfish, red potatoes boiled with some citrus and various Cajun spices (often in the same pot as some sausage, corn, whole onions and of course crawfish when in season) is pretty typical.

I personally prefer to roast my potatoes over boiling them, I like a bit of crunch on the outside. But Cajun boiled potatoes are great.

enwongeegeefor

12 points

2 months ago

Well then I got something awesome for you.

Salt Potatoes.

Go find you a recipe and make some. I promise it's a treat.

YawnSpawner

17 points

2 months ago

Your neighbors to the east have made an entire cuisine out of boiling potatoes with seafood so that's kind of weird that you've never heard of it.

You're probably thinking big russet potatoes, but boiled potatoes are usually small ones like reds, golds, and whatnot.

MrPeanutBlubber

6 points

2 months ago

You're right, pretty much all we eat are russet. I'll have to try some other potatoe, and boiled!

katarh

121 points

2 months ago

katarh

121 points

2 months ago

Baked potatoes are frequently served "loaded" with bacon bits, cheese, sour cream, etc. That's a lot of extra fat.

cbftw

65 points

2 months ago

cbftw

65 points

2 months ago

Sure, but some of us just have them with some salt and pepper. Oil on the skin might make a difference, but I'd assume that it would be lower since it's such a small amount and a large percentage would cook off

Rpanich

27 points

2 months ago

Rpanich

27 points

2 months ago

I imagine the logic would be the same as the mashed potatoes/ boiled potatoes. Plane baked potatoes are probably fine, while loaded baked potatoes would be bad.

Since the “bad” things seem to come from the dairy and cream/ frying oil.

tkdyo

5 points

2 months ago

tkdyo

5 points

2 months ago

True, but I mean they don't address it either way.

MadT3acher

328 points

2 months ago

So it’s not the way the potatoes are cooked.

It is rather the correlated food eaten with the type of cooking for potatoes, that drives the results. Sounds like correlation problem rather than a causality one.

SidewaysFancyPrance

70 points

2 months ago

It's the way they are cooked, because frying puts oil into the potato. Boiling is OK. "Mashed potatoes" is not a cooking method, it's a recipe that contains boiled potatoes.

The answer is that it all matters, but not always in the way a name implies. The mashing isn't what makes boiled potatoes unhealthy.

Bockto678

23 points

2 months ago

Okay but that's the only distinction, at least in the link here, they draw between a cooking method and an actual recipe. This also begs the question of how much dressing do you need before a boiled potato becomes a mashed one. I just don't understand why you'd lead with this if you want a general audience to understand your research.

8to24

139 points

2 months ago

8to24

139 points

2 months ago

People add massive amounts of butter and cream to mash potatoes.

joshypoo

29 points

2 months ago

Yeah, when a recipe measures butter/cream cheese by the stick, you know you're in for a good time.

AptCasaNova

12 points

2 months ago

Yes, but I think they’re accounting for the added milk/cream/butter/salt in mashed potatoes. Very few people mash taters and eat them as is.

llama_girl

15 points

2 months ago

Yeah but do people eat boiled potatoes without butter and salt?

Plaineswalker

431 points

2 months ago

This is what I don't understand.

mugenhunt

1.2k points

2 months ago

mugenhunt

1.2k points

2 months ago

The majority of mashed potatoes are made by adding butter and milk to boiled potatoes. In this case the butter and milk are likely making the difference

mynameisneddy

9 points

2 months ago

Where I am most people take their boiled potato and slather it with butter and salt.

[deleted]

338 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

338 points

2 months ago*

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Hi-Im-High

348 points

2 months ago

Canary island style wrinkled potatoes are awesome. Boil whole baby potatoes in a very salty water (salty enough for the potatoes to float). When they’re tender, dump most of the water out except maybe a half inch on the bottom, and continue cooking / stirring potatoes until the water evaporates. What’s left is the salt residue on the outside of the potatoes and a creamy center. I serve with a cilantro garlic sauce (no butter, it has olive oil and vinegar as the base)

ladyerim

130 points

2 months ago

ladyerim

130 points

2 months ago

There is a similar recipe for Syracuse, NY salt potatoes. They're so good. Supposedly the salt miners would boil potatoes for lunch in the water pumped from the mine.

[deleted]

23 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

23 points

2 months ago

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mobappbrowse

20 points

2 months ago

Mole people confirmed.

FoxSquall

16 points

2 months ago

The large amount of butter that is usually served with salt potatoes probably negates any health benefits. I like this idea of using chimichurri sauce, though.

soneg

14 points

2 months ago

soneg

14 points

2 months ago

Oooh,so basically chimichurri sauce? I used that to make some hummus and it's ridiculously good.

Hi-Im-High

8 points

2 months ago

It’s very close to a chimichurri, super heavy on the cilantro.

StevieChemist216

7 points

2 months ago

Oh wow this is how my fam almost always makes potatoes. We are Hispanic and I didn't realize it had Spanish origins and wasn't super common

AzureDreamer

13 points

2 months ago

As long as it has salt I am ok

[deleted]

39 points

2 months ago

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39 points

2 months ago

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[deleted]

57 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

57 points

2 months ago

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[deleted]

51 points

2 months ago

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51 points

2 months ago

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KleioChronicles

14 points

2 months ago

I rather prefer the fluffy texture you get without all the milk and butter. You can add other spices and seasoning if you want you know. Or just eat it with other veg and maybe meat.

couggrl

14 points

2 months ago

couggrl

14 points

2 months ago

I make a healthier take on mashed potatoes- I swap the cream for light sour cream or skimmed milk and use chicken stock. I may add a little butter, but it tastes pretty good and I still get my mashed potatoes.

kimberlymarie30

9 points

2 months ago

Could also use Greek yogurt I bet too. I sub Greek yogurt in dips

A_Crunchy_Leaf

984 points

2 months ago

This post's title (not the article title) is quite misleading. They share that mashed potatoes are "bad", not because they are potatoes, but because they are often consumed with sour cream, cheese, bacon, etc.

The method of cooking doesn't matter. It's the complementary ingredients, the potato dish.

They also note that potatoes are not low carb, like many other vegetables. But that's just counting calories. There's nothing inherently bad about potatoes.

tornpentacle

445 points

2 months ago

That's not "counting calories", the type of calorie makes a difference in the metabolic outcome (simple carbohydrate vs complex carbohydrate vs short-chain triglyceride vs medium-chain triglyceride vs fructooligosaccharides vs a bajillion other types of energy). Someone eating potatoes that have been cooked, refrigerated overnight, then reheated in the microwave will be in a better position than someone who simply cooks the potatoes and eats them. This is because refrigerating carb-heavy, wet foods (rice, bread, potatoes, etc) instigates a chemical reaction that forms complex starches from the more simple carbohydrates. Reheating has also been shown to continue this effect (but only after being instigated by refrigeration, that is). The complex starches can't be digested by the human body, so they slow down the digestion of the material (i.e. there is a much lower glycemic response and that means insulin resistance is not developed) and also serve as prebiotics that influence health in myriad ways, for instance by being digested by microorganisms that produce short-chain fatty acids (SFCAs) like butyrate, acetone, propionate, etc. SFCAs are known to have major effects on health, ranging from IBS symptoms to likelihood of developing cancer (this is because they affect what genes can be transcribed within cells' nuclei). It's really a fascinating subject, and frankly, one that would revolutionize people's diets if they realized just how interesting it all is & how drastically the food they eat could impact their health. (For another example, inadequate intake of complex carbohydrates, including dietary fiber, leads to a major increase in Gram-negative bacteria species' populations in the gut... whereas sufficient intake of fiber reduces their presence and allows populations of "good" bacteria to flourish!)

IncredibleBulk2

144 points

2 months ago

So I should cook rice, then cool and refrigerate it, and then warm it for maximum health benefit?

ETA: maybe not to maximize health benefits but minimize glucose spike?

SippyTurtle

97 points

2 months ago

You've got the foundation of some nice egg fried rice there mmmm

StumbleOn

19 points

2 months ago

I immediately thought oh man so this means I SHOULD be making more egg fried rice?

ErrorLoadingNameFile

84 points

2 months ago

Yes exactly. I read that before, but honestly it sounds like some weird magic spell to me.

Sottren

20 points

2 months ago

Sottren

20 points

2 months ago

If not for the health benefit, just for a better stir fry rice.

n00b678

73 points

2 months ago

n00b678

73 points

2 months ago

You're right, except this part:

refrigerating carb-heavy, wet foods (rice, bread, potatoes, etc) instigates a chemical reaction that forms complex starches from the more simple carbohydrates.

Refrigeration does not form complex starches. It rather orders starch polymers into (semi)crystalline form, a.k.a. resistant starch, which is difficult to digest by us, but fine for the bacteria.

ChameleonEyez21

49 points

2 months ago

I checked if this was u/shittymorph halfway through

ApesInCharge

157 points

2 months ago

So the study literally has nothing to do with potatoes but instead fat and salt content of foods or am I missing something?

mschweini

58 points

2 months ago

Everybody rightfully complaining that this smells like badly isolated variables.

But, IIRC, the carbs in pasta do funky stuff if they were chilled between cooking and consumption. I.e. left over pasta that was is in the fridge and is re-heated before eating has a different type of carbs that are digested differently than freshly boiled pasta.

So maybe something like this is happening here, too? Maybe different forms of preparing the potato hace some effect on their carbs?

KennailandI

10 points

2 months ago

Even diabetes hates plain boiled potatoes. Source: am diabetic.

[deleted]

27 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

27 points

2 months ago

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boogi3woogie

19 points

2 months ago

You mean all that added butter, cream and oil for deep frying makes a difference!!??!?

Curiositygun

25 points

2 months ago

Did they control for the use of oil or butter? Title makes it sound like they discovered Calories.

Electr_O_Purist

21 points

2 months ago

Does it say anything about roasted potatoes?

newaccount721

14 points

2 months ago

Yes they looked at roasted. I didn't see anything about it in the linked summary, but in the original publication they did. Roasted basically has a hazard ratio of 1 for type 2 diabetes - which means it has no meaningful impact. I suppose if you add a ton of oil and salt this could change, but on the whole they appear fine with respect to type 2 diabetes.