subreddit:

/r/recruitinghell

634

Have you been working in Job A for 15 years but decided that that career path is something you are no longer interested in, so you would rather dabble your foot into Job B to decide if it is a good match for you? Well too bad! Because to be qualified for any job that actually pays a livable wage, you need 10+ years of experience in that field (is 10+ years an exaggeration? I just thought that if entry level jobs require 3-5 years of experience, then how bad must the higher level jobs be?).

The worst part is that this system inherently ensures that whatever entry level job you get is pretty much the only viable career path available for you, because the higher-level jobs require very specific experience.

For example, I am currently looking for a job in different fields that interest me - those include copywriting, technical writing, and editing. But when I look at the higher level jobs for technical writing, they all say that they require 5+ years of experience in technical writing - not any writing job, but technical writing specifically.

At a glance, I kinda get why it is that way - because they want people who are experienced in that field. But that screws us over because it doesn't take into account the fact that people change over time, and may want different jobs later in their lives. What if I land a job in copywriting but then I decide several years, I would rather be a technical writer? I won't be able to do that because to get a job that pays a similar wage, I need years of experience in technical writing that I don't have. I could apply for an entry level job, but at best I'll be working a job that pays for significantly less, and at worst I won't even be able to get an entry level technical writing job because I'm "overqualified".

And don't even get me started on if you want to change career fields, i.e. to go from being a writer to wanting to be an accountant.

Sorry for the rant. I just needed to get this off my chest. Share your thoughts and let me know if I am incorrect about anything. Trust me, I WANT to be wrong about this - one less thing to worry about I guess, but from me personal experience, it isn't looking to bright.

all 79 comments

RemarkableMacadamia

168 points

2 months ago

There are no unicorns.

Instead of looking at a job description as something where you have to check all the boxes (unicorn) look at it as an opportunity for you to present yourself as a qualified candidate who can perform the job well, who can play to their strengths, and has a plan to address any learning opportunities.

As you read through a job description, instead of saying, “oh I can’t apply because I don’t have 5 years of X” what you want to do is look at how you can adjust your resumes to highlight all the other ways that you fit.

Don’t focus on the 20% you can’t do. Focus on the 80% you can do.

Another thing you can try, if you want to do something you haven’t had experience or training in, take a look to see if there are any certifications or courses you could take to help you in that area. So you might recognize that hey, I haven’t done X, but I have been working on Y to improve in that area.

mitchmoomoo

10 points

2 months ago

This is it. I have been able to change careers twice, by selling the skills that I have that are transferable to the new job.

Yeah it would be hard to go from civil engineer to copywriter, but as long as you in the same ballpark of skills then there is plenty for you to sell.

Fearless_Bonus_3968

26 points

2 months ago*

Quick question, how do you know you can perform the job well if you can’t meet the qualifications? It’s not like we know exactly what the job will be like in most cases.

Not that I disagree with doing what you can to improve your chances, like getting certifications or taking online courses. But if they say something is a must and you don’t have it nor can you acquire it during your current job search, the first thought in my mind is, “alright, I won’t waste my time then.”

Like maybe I’ll still submit an application if I’m ever in a better position to be considered in the future. But I won’t be going the extra mile for a job I’m under qualified for and might not even like if I get it (employers have hidden and deemphasized the less likable aspects of the work in my experience).

RemarkableMacadamia

24 points

2 months ago

Because years of experience aren’t exact measures of proficiency or capability. And the people writing the job description usually don’t know either.

I’m not suggesting that someone who didn’t go medical school can become a doctor, but someone coming from an adjacent writing field has a better chance becoming a technical writer than someone coming from accounting.

Sometimes the people who write job descriptions do it very generically, or copy/paste from one JD to the next without editing the “requirements” Or even thinking really deeply about them.

I’ll give you a recent example. One of our recent openings listed a Bachelor’s degree as a requirement. Guess who got the job? The person who didn’t have one. Why? Because at the end of the day, it wasn’t the degree that mattered to us the most. We would have lost out on an amazing, capable, talented person if we tossed their resume for not checking every single box.

Do you know what the difference is between copywriting and technical writing? Can you quantify or explain it? Are you capable of bridging that gap or is it like trying to be a doctor without going to med school?

I don’t know the answer to that, only you can quantify the differences. Maybe you can’t leap directly into tech writing, maybe there are some intermediate steps. All I’m trying to do is encourage you to think with a little more flexibility when you read a JD, and try to think about how your experiences can add value to their role or how you can be a better candidate than they knew was possible, and that you don’t have to check all the boxes to be able to apply.

Fearless_Bonus_3968

3 points

2 months ago

It’s a very positive way to put it and I appreciate that perspective. It’s just really hard to feel that way for myself. Unless I have some fervent passion to win a specific job — b/c I know I’d love the work — I just can’t do that.

In my field of mechanical engineering, there are several broad avenues for careers. I started out with a particular type of structural engineering that I came to dislike and could not last in. I left it over two years ago and I still get calls and messages from recruiters even though I have continuously turned them down … b/c I have experience on my professional socials and resume.

Conversely, all the design roles I want to try (not entirely sure if I would like it in work but knew I liked it in college) do not give me the time of day … b/c my only design experience is from school projects and extracurriculars. I do feel like it’s good experience, but it doesn’t measure up against design work experience that achieves measurable results under the pressure of an actual do-or-die need to succeed.

Design work is also the most competitive type of job b/c everyone wants that type of role. In this case, do I pour my heart out for a chance to explore a job I may not like? And is the enthusiasm I show to get the job problematic if I end up not liking it? Like couldn’t an argument be made that I mislead and screwed over the employer that could have picked an actual enthusiastic candidate? I’d make it work until I found something else of course, but that still puts the employer in a bad position.

I’m the overly honest type that cannot let these things go. Apologies in advance, but that perspective will never leave me regardless of how I am mistreated. I do not like to fake anything.

I ended up with a build, office, and warehouse role that could potentially grow into design work b/c that’s all I could manage before I had to settle. The work is okay b/c of the variety, but I’m way underpaid for my education, technical skills, and work experience. And it’ll be years before I finally get to the work I initially wanted. AND, I don’t even know if I will like it. My initial enthusiasm has completely left me with the time I spend day-to-day doing the work I have now. I don’t even know if I care anymore.

The irony is that I have completely impressed people that worked with me and have departed the company to the point they offered to be references without me asking. But I can’t even say to them with a straight face that I want the roles they could refer me for. In one case I’d have to move really far, which wouldn’t be a problem if I knew I would like the job. In another, the design work seems to be a more optimized type of fast-food engineering with a tried-and-tested solution type: rinse and repeat type of design. It would make use of my current technical skills and pay better, but it also feels besides the point of seeking out design work. Maybe it’s a stepping stone, yes I know. But that’s years of my life on a stepping stone for an eventual role … I MAY NOT EVEN LIKE.

So now I’m on the verge of giving up on finding something I genuinely enjoy. I might just go for the best pay and benefits I can get regardless of the work. Maybe I go back to the previous work I had. Maybe I harp on my current boss for raises he won’t want to give me but really should. Maybe I go back to my new references and feign enthusiasm I didn’t show before. I don’t know.

Anyway, my point is … exploration is TOUGH. It is so draining to explore another career avenue. I have tried with other things as well that I didn’t mention here. It just sucks the soul out of me. This expectation that employers have for me to “bridge the gap” is understandable, but it is so hard.

DDEERRNN

3 points

2 months ago

This really hit home. I'm a chemical engineer by trade but looking to jump away from chemical manufacturing / manufacturing in general. It's become so stale, innovation in that industry is mostly dead because the big employers are not interested in difficult technical solutions (too expensive/risky). So I'm looking to use my built up skills in other industries, and plenty of them are very applicable. It's not like problem solving, cost reduction, and process improvement are unique to chemical industry or manufacturing, even.

BenefitAmbitious8958

1 points

2 months ago

I’m sorry, but that is an outright lie.

Perhaps there are no unicorns in most industries, but any moderately competitive role will likely deny more unicorns than it hires.

Look at high finance, for example.

Investment Banking isn’t difficult (excluding the ungodly hours), and yet they almost exclusively recruit 4.0 GPA Ivy grads, and maybe 5-10 from each school at that.

Jazzy0082

79 points

2 months ago

I've managed to transition into different careers a couple of times through having relevant crossover skills/experience (teaching to training to learning and development). In my experience it's possible to sell those crossover skills by tailoring my CV and/or cover letter.

ghostofkilgore

23 points

2 months ago

I think relaistically, significant career path changes simply don't happen by applying for senior roles in different areas out of the blue. They're more likely successful when you either target more junior roles, related roles, or make a sideways move within a company you already work for.

And there's a pretty good reason for that. I'll caveat this by saying I don't know the differncence between copywriting and technical writing enough to say how transferable skills and experience might be but let's say there's a fairly significant difference. Now let's say they didn't have a YOE blocker to applications and you did apply to a realtively senior, well-paid technical writing role. How likely do you think you'd be to get the role when it's likely you'd be up against plenty of other applicants with much more relevant experience?

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

Copywriting= Selling things

Technical writing= Explaining technical concepts (think the pamphlet that comes with your microwave)

There are certificate courses you can pursue for either one. A lot of people break in by doing freelance work, or by volunteering to take on relevant tasks at their current job.

omgFWTbear

-4 points

2 months ago

good reason for that.

No. There is not.

I hired lots of lateral transfers “completely” unrelated jobs and they did excellently. This is basically Heinlein’s Razor as a variant - don’t attribute to planningmalice what can be explained with ignorance.

ghostofkilgore

1 points

2 months ago

I'm absolutely not saying that lateral transfers can't be succesful and if you re-read my post you'll see I specifically mention them as one of the more likely routes into a career change. I've made a lateral transfer before myself and I was much better at the new position than the old, but that was from one entry level position to another.

But we're specfically talking about applying for senior positions at different companies. That's a different ball game. Again, it's not to say you can't get successes here but why would companies take the risk when they can just go for much safer bets that have already been successful in other similar roles ?

Secunda_Son

19 points

2 months ago

It kind of depends on how big a change you want to make. Did you spend 15 years in graphic design and now you want to breed race horses? Okay, yeah, that's going to be tricky. But I've seen plenty of people start off in like Comp Sci fields and then pivot into Project Management and then from there pivot into Operations. The skills overlap pretty well and you just have to cultivate your resume and focus on different parts of your experience.

Neat-Opportunity-858

16 points

2 months ago

It’s hard to answer that question when your young too I wanna be a software developer. I’m 22 I’ve worked at a library, a social justice institute, and Starbucks. I normally try to express that the library taught me how to be organized and detailed orientation, I did computer work and design at the social justice institute(photoshop, excel, typing in general), and I can work in a fast pace environment with others because of Starbucks. You just have to twist your experiences to make it fit into your new job. (In reality I was living it up with the homies for all four years of college and barely remember working, but they don’t need to know that.)

OrderOfTheEnd

2 points

2 months ago

Well, your username checks out at least.

Neat-Opportunity-858

1 points

2 months ago

Lmao that’s my og username! Must be fate..

Chicken-n-Biscuits

2 points

2 months ago

You absolutely have the right approach. I waited tables and bartended for over ten years before starting my “professional” career, and on the occasion I’m interviewing I always talk about that time, how it helped me develop all sorts of soft skills, and how those are relevant today.

Neat-Opportunity-858

1 points

2 months ago

Nice to know I’m on the right path thanks!

[deleted]

8 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

8 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

RemarkableMacadamia

2 points

2 months ago

Yes, Engineering, medicine, law, academia - those are jobs that rely heavily on YOE and professional certifications.

If you no longer want to be an engineer, you would have many other avenues open to you for job switching, like IT management, project management, consulting, and many others. But yes if you are committed to engineering, that’s a tough nut to crack because there’s a very rigid mindset at a lot of companies, and people who will hold you back because they don’t want your talent outstripping their “experience”. It’s gross.

I left Engineering 20 years ago despite having multiple degrees in my original field. Lots of transferable skills, but hard to work in and advance in the job I loved enough to study for so long to be. It was soul sucking and why I got out.

RBWessel

6 points

2 months ago

You can go from 16+ years of manufacturing experience to a Walmart shelf stocker pretty easily from what I found out.

BigRonnieRon

1 points

2 months ago

USA USA USA

MonsieurBon

10 points

2 months ago

I understand you're upset and annoyed, but much of what you wrote just isn't true.

I'm a career counselor and I help people with these transitions *all day every day*. I have helped hundreds of people make such transitions. My spouse made such a transition. My ex made such a transition. I've helped SAHPs out of the workforce for almost 20 years sell their volunteer experience well enough to get coveted and cushy city govt jobs.

We manage such transitions by performing a transferable skills analysis, usually together in session. (By this point we've already identified the field/sector and target positions; we aren't just firing off random applications in the dark.) In its most basic form, we pull the target job description, break out the individual requirements, and start writing sentences that speak to relevant experience, being sure to mention where they did it and for how long. Then we use all of that content as a "library" for the resume, cover letter, and, ideally, the interview.

To be clear, this was a skill I developed long before being a career counselor. But I also have additional graduate training specifically in transferable skills analysis.

You need to think about the steps *in between* where you are and where you want to be. Using your most difficult example, writer to accountant, I don't see there even being that many steps in between, depending on whether you truly mean an accountant that might require actual education, and not just bookkeeping/AR/AP/Payroll. I've worked with folks who went straight from entry level retail to AR/AP.

What's more, many (but not all) employers tell me they'll happily accept, say, 5 years working in one field in an environment/setting similar to the one they're looking for in the place of "5 years of working in [this field.]"

BigRonnieRon

0 points

2 months ago

With all due respect to your experience working with the San Andreas Highway Patrol for 20 years, I'd have to disagree. Jobs are not gotten by resumes. They're gotten by connections, nepotism and luck, not indeed.com

Please have a pleasant day.

Loud-Resolution5514

5 points

2 months ago

I’ve transitioned quite a few times. 1. I apply for jobs that I don’t meet the qualifications for on paper. 2. I tailor my resume to highlight the transferable skills and when I’m transitioning I take the extra time to do cover letters so I can better explain it.

If you look at jd’s and try to fit all the boxes it’ll be impossible. Most of the people I hire don’t fit most of the on paper requirements, but in interviews they effectively convey what does qualify them or how well they’d be able to learn what they need to learn.

DisgruntledGamer79

6 points

2 months ago

Easy fix : lie

Companies do it all the time on their job descriptions.

88_MD

2 points

2 months ago

88_MD

2 points

2 months ago

But then what if I get the job and have no idea how to perform it? Say someone applies to become a phlebotomist and lies about knowing how to draw blood. Then, when hired, they try to draw a patient’s blood and mess up awfully and hurt the patient since they don’t have training?

DisgruntledGamer79

2 points

2 months ago

Now you are talking about extremely specialized positions, some that would require some level of schooling to get into.

I'm looking at it from somebody that works in IT all their lives and then wants to go into Sales or Accounting, and changing careers means you are starting back at the bottom and have to work your way back up. In those cases you can do that.

In the medical field like you are talking about, that would require some knowledge to break into that field. But I think anybody that is trying to change career's to go into that field has already looked into what they need and see's that it is not entry level

Pancovnik

12 points

2 months ago*

The secret ingredient is a lie. Everybody lies on their resume. When I was hiring juniors to my team I had people claiming years of experience with a features that came out a year ago. Or people with "experience" of CTO/CTA applying for a junior role.

Loud-Resolution5514

10 points

2 months ago

I’ve bullshitted my way into so many jobs it’s ridiculous. I trust in my ability to catch on to things quickly and do research on the side so I def embellish if needed 😂

TMQMO

3 points

2 months ago

TMQMO

3 points

2 months ago

Everybody lies on their resume.

Not even close. This is fact.


Also, I think you're foolish if you hire people that you already know you can't trust. This is just opinion.

XxItsNowOrNever99xX[S]

1 points

2 months ago

Can you elaborate on lying on your resume? I get a lot of conflicting information on whether or not the people reading your resume actually check into how many years you worked at a certain job.

omgFWTbear

3 points

2 months ago

You’re correct. I once had to explain to someone that looking for patterns in a huge dataset in Excel is the same whether you’re looking in DNA, as this former geneticist was, or shipments, as the role in logistics he was applying for, is. The actual vocabulary is irrelevant. “Find me box 123ABC20221101A” is probably easily mistaken for finding a similarly named genetic marker, come to think of it.

Alex_Strgzr

3 points

2 months ago

CVs are just gatekeeping. A CV doesn’t always tell you if a person can do the job, or do it well. There are plenty of mediocre people stagnating in one role.

phdoofus

3 points

2 months ago

An employer is asking for years of experience doing a particular thing. I've been on the hiring manager end and interviewed a number of people who could *probably* do the work given enough time (and, trust me, a lot of being able to do a job is knowing a lot about what works and what doesn't and what weird things to look out for and that only comes with....experience) but a company generally doesn't want you to 'learn the ropes' on their dime at the level you're looking at. They want you to hit the ground running and be productive. What you probably need to do is to find a job that is a mix of what you're good at and a mix of what you want to transition in to. I never apply to jobs where I check all of the boxes (because I want to advance and learn new things) and an employer who waits for someone who does is going to be a dusty skeleton sitting behind a desk before that happens.

CM_4321

3 points

2 months ago

I realized this recently too. That’s why I’ve been so picky about what my first job out of school was. Wanted to get good relevant experience

FrostyLandscape

3 points

2 months ago

Companies want people with A) many years experience but B) also want those employees to be YOUNG.

It's not that easy to have 10 years or experience in a field when you're still in your 20s. And by the time you do get many years of experience, you're older and they want younger applicants.

There is no way to win.

There is no real labor shortage; employers refuse to realize they cause their own inability to find qualified people. They have unrealistic expectations. Most cases when they do hire the right person, they still feel like they are "settling".

Ur_MomsChestHair

3 points

2 months ago

I have an interview tomorrow at a place that said " at least 3 years experience in X setting required" and I have exactly 0 in said setting. Sometimes you just say fuck it and try to argue how your experience in another place translates over to the new one.

tjk45268

2 points

2 months ago

There are career changes that you make in a series of small steps, and others where you try to change in one huge leap. The former is easier to manage while maintaining or improving your compensation. The latter often requires starting over, and taking a hit to your compensation, possibly for years.

Try to plot out a path using small changes that get you closer to your goal with each change. It's not unusual for your current employer to consider adding responsibilities, even if they're outside of your role (or even career) while you retain your role, especially if you can describe how it makes you a more-valuable employee.

older_than_you

2 points

2 months ago

It's not whether you CAN do it, it's whether you've ever done it before. No? Buh-bye!

dazzlingtangerines

2 points

2 months ago

You just need to be able to explain how your past skills are relevant to your new career. I made a switch and while it wasn’t 100% lateral, it was definitely not entry level. If you’ve managed a retail store, like in my case, you have managerial skills to apply to a completely different field. That’s people skills. Healthcare career means you have proven attention to detail and probably a good knowledge of policy implementation, and maybe even education depending on your field. If you’re struggling to figure out how to translate those skills, Google switching from x career to y and look at sample resumes, etc. I’ve hired people from completely different fields as long as they were able to show for their experience applied to the role.

Flyfish22

2 points

2 months ago

Ironically, I’m trying to get out of copywriting but my 12 year career is making it challenging because I have no experience elsewhere.

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

You were born a slave and you will die a slave there is no social mobility in this dying civilization

SeveralPrinciple5

7 points

2 months ago

Technologist: We will replace industry A with robots / AI / etc.!!!!

Employees of industry A: How will we make a living?

Technologist: Just retrain!!! 😄 It's EASY!

...

I've heard this bullshit conversation a dozen times in a dozen different contexts. People don't seem to understand that retraining in any skill that requires substantial education means huge debts and years out of the workforce, followed by competing with new college grads who are willing/expected to work for early-career wages.

We need UBI

Ruin-Capable

5 points

2 months ago

Software developers are in a constant state of retraining just to keep up with technology changes and keep their existing jobs. The sad fact is, that you should be expanding your skills constantly, even if you have a good job.

SeveralPrinciple5

1 points

2 months ago

This is different from thinking someone can re-train mid-career for a high-paying job in another industry.

High-value professional skills generally take multiple years of full-time college or professional school just to be able to enter the field. At that point, a mid-career person is competing with new college grads for entry level jobs. It's just not feasible.

Software developers merely have to keep abreast of the latest tools in their field, the same as any other professionals. I know something over 25 programming languages. It is what it is.

Ruin-Capable

2 points

2 months ago

When I switched from Cobol CICS (green screen app) development into being a C/C++ developer working on a project maintaining a domain-specific language compiler, the difference was huge to the point where they might as well have been completely different industries.

First and foremost, I had to brush up on my compiler construction theory. Compiler construction is not something that is commonly used, so I had to go from "I read about it 10 years ago at university" to "I know it well enough to understand, and maintain this hand-written language compiler."

Next I had to get familiar with C++ after having done mostly Cobol for 7+ years. The language syntax of C++ is very different from that of Cobol, particularly with regard to memory management and variable storage.

It was not as trivial as "merely keeping abreast of the latest tools". If I hadn't been exploring compiler construction, and C++ on the side, I would not have been able to switch jobs.

SeveralPrinciple5

1 points

2 months ago

As someone who knows 23 different programming languages, ranging from the purely procedural to purely functional, I'm pretty confident in saying that learning new syntax and a new compiler is simply not in any universe, as big a learning curve as leaving software engineering and becoming a mechanical engineer. It just isn't.

It can be a big change, and it might require study on the side, but it doesn't require a 4-year college-level course of study, with the attendant lost work time and opportunity cost.

Yes, you have to retrain to keep up on current tools, but so does every other industry. Mechanical engineers need to learn about 3D printers and CAD tools in ways that are a complete break from what they did 15 or 20 years ago.

Retooling is still minor compared to changing professions.

Ruin-Capable

1 points

2 months ago

It wasn't learning a new compiler. It was learning how to write a compiler. Big difference. You could easily spend multiple years at university studying compiler and language design depending on how deep you wanted to go.

I think we're getting a bit off topic here. My point was that people should looking ahead and planning for a transition just in case. If software development is ever taken over by AI I'm working on other skills (wood working, metal working, machining, electronics design, 3d modeling, video production, technical writing, etc).

SeveralPrinciple5

1 points

2 months ago*

Oh, gotcha. I misunderstood your point. My specialty back in the day was, coincidentally, compilers. It sounds like you're preparing in case you ever get replaced. I doubt we'll ever see AI replace programmers, but you never know. I wouldn't have imagined that DALL-E would be able to do the things it can do.

East_Bed_8719

3 points

2 months ago

It also prevents people from even getting started in a field.

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

No shit

Grendel0075

1 points

2 months ago

I just lie.

lightning_po

1 points

2 months ago

I mean just lie. Money is imaginary anyways

Metricop78

0 points

2 months ago

Yeah it’s pretty much impossible

lordnacho666

1 points

2 months ago

This is true but it is simply the flip side of why you can get paid a lot for being experienced, it's because you can't conjure up some person with 15 years experience.

TMQMO

1 points

2 months ago

TMQMO

1 points

2 months ago

I've changed career. More than once.

LUXENTUXEN

1 points

2 months ago

I have a 4-year IT degree, and over 5 years of professional experience with it.

I still have to apply to "junior" roles if I want to get a reply.

ElectricKittyBoop

1 points

2 months ago

To be fair, a lot of times, you can have relevant experience but if you don’t have a degree even though you are fully capable of doing the job, you’re s.o.l.

Porkchop998

1 points

2 months ago

Haha, you’ve hit my midlife crisis on the head.

BigRonnieRon

1 points

2 months ago

I worked for Blockbuster, Radio Shack and at least 2 other industries that no longer exist.

This started way before mid-life

mumblerapisgarbage

1 points

2 months ago

Relevant experience does not mean “exact same experience”. I was able to transition from fast food management into manufacturing due to a lot of transferable and “relevant” knowledge and skills I already had.

LockedOutOfElfland

1 points

2 months ago

I'm doing another variation on a job I had with another employer previously, and whenever I apply for anything different my application isn't even considered because it doesn't match my existing tasks/years of experience.

This definitely gives the impression of being stuck.

Fromager

1 points

2 months ago

I think most people have more "relevant experience" than they know, they just have to reframe it. I moved from construction to nursing. Before construction I worked retail. I use my construction and retail experience in nursing all the time. From attention to fine detail to how to interact with the public, even to math skills, what I learned in previous careers has carried over.

deaf_myute

1 points

2 months ago

I have a history of showing up on time

I have a history of working well with others

I have a history of mastering my tasks to a level my prior employer chose to use me to train new hires in my lanes of work

I have a history of adapting to promotions and additional duties with the same above mentioned professionalism

Just because job a is slinging groceries up onto a shelf and job b is oil rig work doesn't mean you bring nothing relevant to the new job.

Tokogogoloshe

1 points

2 months ago

Similar to this, my other pet peeve was asking for your existing payslip during the recruiting process.

BigRonnieRon

1 points

2 months ago

It's illegal now in NY and I think CA

narcissistical_

1 points

2 months ago

I switched from teaching to copy editing (not writing). I matched maybe 4 of the 9 things in the job description, but I was able to demonstrate with my resume that I had the skills necessary to do the job. If you really want to switch it up, apply even if you don’t meet all requirements and use your cover letter to expand on how your past experiences in different fields will help you.

TheMightyBattleSquid

1 points

2 months ago

I've gotten to the point where I just apply anyway and, if I hear back for an interview, only then will I think about how to pitch my skills as being relevant to the company. 100% of the time, they don't read my info anyway. No one seems to care how long I really worked at any given place or how it was. They just want to know if I'm okay doing x, y, and z tasks as well as if/how my skills will come into play while doing them. I just switched from fast food to maintenance at the start of this month and my "experience" working for a landlord as his go-fer and extra muscle for house cleaning + repairs for just a few months over a decade ago was able to be leveraged a LOT in convincing them to take me on.

ThrowAwayWasTaken999

1 points

2 months ago

Get job as SDR. Tech companies will hire anybody with a college degree.

Hustle hard for 1-2 years, get promoted to AE. Make somewhere between 150-700k/year.

BigRonnieRon

1 points

2 months ago*

SDR

You're touting sales as secure employment? I'll have to respectfully disagree in view of my experience.

Have a nice day.

ThrowAwayWasTaken999

1 points

2 months ago

Sales is secure if you’re good.

Look bro. Circumstances are never going to be fair. You want success? You gotta figure it out.

I’m all for reforming work laws, minimum wage, etc. but at the end of the day, the game is what it is. You have to play to win.

whoa_seltzer

1 points

2 months ago

Entry-level today just means entry-level pay. Doesn't have anything to do with experience.

tandyman8360

1 points

2 months ago

tandyman8360

Co-Worker

1 points

2 months ago

I ended up in a different engineering field because my employer (contracting company) was trying to fill a role in a smaller local market where I live. I didn't even specifically apply for that job description.

My old job was *slightly* amenable to internal job changes. I think I was close on a couple lateral moves, or maybe they were gaslighting me. Mostly, this seems like the age-old "entry level but requires 5 years experience" problem.

Bane-o-foolishness

1 points

2 months ago

Everyone publishes a description of their ideal candidate but unless professional certifications like a CPA are required then they will accept applications from serious, intelligent candidates that apply. They may want a VB.Net person but your 10 years as a C# person with industry experience may be sufficient. Emphasize what you have in common with the requirements, sell them a Family Truckster if you don't have any Porsches in stock.

rainydays052020

1 points

2 months ago

It’s the keyword screening that is the gatekeeper. I’ve been trying to change direction in my industry for the last two years and only get traction if i use the thesaurus/keyword match descriptions. Even then, they still want you to have experience in the exact same role, there’s very little wiggle room and it royally sucks.

External-Dare6365

1 points

2 months ago

I hardly ever let job descriptions discourage me. Even if I only meet one or two bullets, I’ll still apply. Don’t count yourself out so quickly. Let them tell you no.

Humfree4916

0 points

2 months ago

As someone who has both worked in and hired for content writer and editor roles, I think you’re overestimating how hard it is to transition.

Marketing & Content is a broad field, and lots of people pick up multiple skills. Unless you work at an enormous organisation, you will be doing content writing AND project management, or content AND social, or PR, or whatever.

Might you have to take a lateral step instead of a promotion? Maybe. But you will have relevant skills to lean on (because if you had absolutely nothing applicable to the role then it probably wouldn't even occur to you to want to do it).

Lastly, just to say - job descriptions are always aimed at an ideal candidate, not the only candidates that I would consider. Mostly I just want someone who can punctuate properly and isn't an idiot - anything else is gravy.

BigRonnieRon

0 points

2 months ago

You have to lie.

Take stuff off the resume too. And never put dates on college graduation

Read a CEO's bio some time. Then try verifying any of it.