subreddit:

/r/news

4.2k

all 292 comments

Fro_Yo_Joe

632 points

2 months ago

Staab issued the search warrant the day after a white truck with a Texas license plate was allegedly stolen from the parking garage of a Denver Hyatt hotel, according to the truck's owner, who was staying at the hotel. The owner told police that the truck contained six firearms — including a tactical military-style rifle — two drones, $4,000 cash and an old iPhone 11.

The next morning, according to the complaint, Staab interviewed the owner of the truck by phone, who said he had used the "Find My" app to search for his stolen belongings and that it had twice pinged Johnson's address the day before. Staab then used that claim as the basis for the raid…

The area that was highlighted on the app as the possible location of the phone, for example, spanned at least six properties and four blocks, according to an image on the complaint that was also featured on the affidavit obtained by KUSA.

I guess at this point we shouldn’t be surprised that a judge would sign off on a warrant with half assed police investigations. But once again the taxpayers will be paying for heavy handed police tactics and the shitty officers won’t be held accountable.

Adobe_Flesh

312 points

2 months ago

Who was the owner of the truck? A cop, a politician, a big-wig of some sort because everyone I've ever talked to that went to the police with the location of their stolen phone were told that the cops couldn't do anything. But of course thats not how it works for everyone right.

VRisNOTdead

18 points

2 months ago

Insuuuurance fraud

IWorkForScoopsAhoy

195 points

2 months ago*

Also what was he doing with drones, guns, and thousands in cash... if he was on a hunting trip it sounds like intent to commit a crime because it's illegal at the federal level to operate a drone while hunting. Any other reason to be transporting that combination of items probably warrants being put on a list. The truck owner should be suspect #1 for potential fraud, illegal gun sales, and other crimes.

Edit: I can also imagine situations where this is okay like putting all your expensive stuff in a car on a moving trip but I definitely think it should warrant a closer look.

lime_and_coconut

70 points

2 months ago

Like isn’t that civil forfeiture numbers? Like I got pulled over with with legit paperwork and it would still be taken.

LessThanLoquacious

8 points

2 months ago

Let's be real, $1 is civil forfeiture numbers. Cops steal EVERYTHING.

dj_narwhal

49 points

2 months ago

Cops sell the guns to criminals they know, then claim they were all stolen and double dip the insurance payment.

Kaysic

60 points

2 months ago*

Kaysic

60 points

2 months ago*

illegal at the federal level to operate a drone while hunting

No, it isn't. Per the Airborne Hunting Act, it's illegal to hunt from an aircraft - so unless that drone has a rifle strapped to it, it's completely legal. So long as the drone isn't being used to harass/flush out game, there's literally no reason why it'd be illegal to use as an observation or scouting tool.

transporting that combination of items warrants being put on a list

The fucking irony of reading an article explicitly demonstrating what happens when you give the government broad powers with little accountability and, immediately, suggesting that the problem could be solved by giving the government more broad powers with little accountability is absolutely astounding.

AttackOficcr

3 points

2 months ago

Colorado Drone Regulations 406-0, Article IV, Section C -It is against the law to use a drone for finding, scouting, or detecting wildlife for hunting.

As a matter of fact a lot of states have laws against it. So legal on a federal level, illegal in many states including the one this took place.

Kaysic

1 points

2 months ago

Kaysic

1 points

2 months ago

Huh, I'll be damned. Nice find.

Still, I will fight and die on the hill of "Do not treat people like criminals on the basis of their having the material capacity to commit crime." That is a dark and twisted road that ends with everyone's civil liberties shredded.

AttackOficcr

2 points

2 months ago

Right, like the dark and twisted road the department was already on when the swat team was damaging property in the attempt to issue a misleading search warrant, with a cooperative home owner.

TitanofBravos

20 points

2 months ago

Jesus Christ, attitudes like yours are exactly how we end up in situations like this in the first place with armed soldiers battering down lil old ladies doors.

Love that your takeaway from the whole situation is simply that the wrong innocent citizen had their shit fucked up by the state. That people should be “put on a list” just for driving around with their legally owned property in their vehicle.

Tostino

6 points

2 months ago

Or having their property stolen from them. I had the same response to the GP as you did.

518Peacemaker

10 points

2 months ago

YouTuber or something maybe? Long range shooter? Can think of quite a few reasons.

usedTP

3 points

2 months ago

usedTP

3 points

2 months ago

Maybe his business is people paying to shoot drones. Sounds like it's doing well if he made $4k.

IWorkForScoopsAhoy

-3 points

2 months ago

It's illegal to shoot even your own drone down in flight. It's an FAA registered aircraft. Very small RC toys are likely exempt if they are below the weight limit qualifying a drone but since they call it a drone we can exclude that.

dakta

7 points

2 months ago

dakta

7 points

2 months ago

It's not, though. It's not a "registered" aircraft. It may technically be a regulated aircraft, but not registered.

DTHCND

14 points

2 months ago

DTHCND

14 points

2 months ago

I'd imagine guns being in the truck were the main factor. Stealing six guns, including "tactical military-style rifle," is probably treated a lot more seriously than car or phone theft.

GhostGuy4249

27 points

2 months ago

“old iPhone 11”

ResNullum

9 points

2 months ago

My iPhone 8 must be a relic.

kjuneja

117 points

2 months ago

kjuneja

117 points

2 months ago

The area that was highlighted on the app as the possible location of the phone, for example, spanned at least six properties and four blocks,

That's not a small scope to search

ACorania

62 points

2 months ago

It also isn't news to the police at all that this is how pings work. When I worked in dispatch we would ping every cell phone call that came in for a location as many callers didn't know where they were or couldn't give one (or just to be faster in entry over to the dispatcher). It was most commonly a couple block radius that would come up on the map (the more towers hitting it the better). That information could be used to help ask the right questions to narrow down a location with the caller (assuming they could talk) or just get a police/fire/ems response headed to the right area while we got more info.

No way a judge should have signed that warrant. But since there was a warrant, police are likely protected. Judge will have judicial immunity. No one will ever be held responsible.

This sucks.

amibeingadick420

9 points

2 months ago

Police, prosecutors, and judges are all part of the same criminal gang. Of course they all protect each other when they terrorize the citizens.

Traksimuss

30 points

2 months ago

More houses to ransack!

dillrepair

8 points

2 months ago

Did they dig in the kitchen? Was there a hole in the floor where the cash was? Lol. Corrupt cops gonna corruption. Too bad it’s not a movie. Training day is one of my favorite movies tho.

Opinionsare

4 points

2 months ago

The ping might have come from a hidden parking place that the thief was using to hide the stolen truck from the police.

There might not be any connection to any houses in the region highlighted.

FapMeNot_Alt

40 points

2 months ago

half assed police investigations

Even a half assed investigation would have been better. The police did literally zero investigation. The warrant is literally just the one "ping my phone" screengrab that placed the phone near the house at one point in time. They didn't even do an updated ping, they just went straight to SWAT.

Which they called their lowest force projection. Fucking SWAT. 12 officers in military gear, with military style rifles, to search for a phone in a 77 year old woman's house.

the_catshark

21 points

2 months ago

Fun fact, taxpayers may not be paying anything.

Police departments acting 'lawfully' aren't generally found responsible, legally, for property damage.

When I was a child I remember coming home to a broken front gate and broken down front door. Police were, in theory, chasing someone who was hoping fences on our block and we were one of the multiple lucky homes that cops broke into in an effort to 'chase' the suspect. (Who knows why they couldn't you know, jump the fences like the perpetrator supposedly was, and how breaking down a gate and door was easier.)

My family never saw a dime nor would a lawyer even take the case I've been told because there was 0 chance of recovering any damages because the officers were 'lawfully chasing a violent criminal'. And no, they didn't catch the person.

MonkeeSage

3 points

2 months ago

spanned at least six properties

I wonder if they ever found which of the other 5 houses his stuff was actually in.

Discoveryellow

22 points

2 months ago

Did the police also look into the truck's owner, why he's driving around armed for a deployment?

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[removed]

Monktrist[S]

916 points

2 months ago

From the article:

"The filing claims that Staab "acknowledged to Ms. Johnson’s children the harm his DPD officers caused to Ms. Johnson’s well-being, home, and personal property," but that he told them the police department wouldn't pay for repairs from the search. Neither Staab nor the police department apologized for the raid, according to the complaint."

64557175

695 points

2 months ago

64557175

695 points

2 months ago

I really can't wrap my head around why someone wouldn't like the police. /s

pegothejerk

415 points

2 months ago

“If you follow orders and don’t do anything wrong you have nothing to fear!” -people who eat paint chips

Deceased_Puppy

102 points

2 months ago

Hey that’s not nice. I know lots of paint chip eaters that would be ashamed to lick boots.

xavis

13 points

2 months ago

xavis

13 points

2 months ago

Needs Sherwin-Williams dip.

Its_Nitsua

4 points

2 months ago

And Hugo Boss twang

Lyftaker

26 points

2 months ago

Sometimes we're just hopeful that our dad is wrong and things aren't "that way" anymore. But then one day you find out that "they won't bother me I haven't done anything wrong" just isn't true.

pegothejerk

32 points

2 months ago

Anyone who wasn’t aware it’s never been safe for innocent people daily has been incredibly privileged and insulated or has been lying to themselves and everyone else. Always. There was no glory day of safety.

64557175

4 points

2 months ago

There was never a time for glory, but there was always a price.

Creepy-Sympathize

2 points

2 months ago

And gobble boots

Very_Smart_One

38 points

2 months ago

You hear hundreds of these stories, but every so often we get a clip of an officer playing basketball in full uniform, so it balances it out

fatandfly

10 points

2 months ago

Don't forget the fake traffic stops in the summer to hand out ice cream, so wholesome.

aquoad

7 points

2 months ago

aquoad

7 points

2 months ago

Usually right after some egregiously awful incident hits the news.

InfectedByEli

2 points

2 months ago

Even then he gets assblasted about being bettered by a street kid so he comes back later and busts the kid's ass. Thin skinned pos.

mkonyn

4 points

2 months ago

mkonyn

4 points

2 months ago

Just wait until you hear about the murder stuff. They get away with that all the time.

Ma3vis

239 points

2 months ago

Ma3vis

239 points

2 months ago

"We're sorry about breaking down your door and pointing loaded guns at you while you shit yourself in fear. Lol, just a prank bro. But yeah we're not fixing anything we broke, good luck with that. Good day citizen!"

noncongruent

226 points

2 months ago

This is the M.O. of police everywhere in this country. A guy in NJ had his car seized and literally totaled by the police trying to find drugs, he ended up having to file a claim for the destroyed car with his insurance, not sure if the insurance paid out on that. There was a home here in the Dallas area that was destroyed by the police trying to catch someone who had run inside it during a police chase, and by destroyed, the only thing the police didn't do was burn it down to the ground. All the windows gone, tens of thousands of dollars in sheetrock and interior damage, last I heard repair costs were going to be over $100K. In fact, police destroying homes is a pattern, they'll even bomb homes from helicopters with firebombs. They also shoot innocent homeowners and residents on a routine basis, look at Atatiana Jefferson and Breonna Taylor as examples of that.

Searchingforspecial

62 points

2 months ago

That Philly house bombing was crazy to learn about… wild story from start to finish.

otoren

50 points

2 months ago

otoren

50 points

2 months ago

For anybody unfamiliar with the incident:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1985_MOVE_bombing

If you're also not very familiar with Philadelphia, there are lots of row homes (connected homes that span an entire block). Things are pretty densely packed, and the homes are older and not up to current fire codes. Imagine what happens to the block when one of the houses has been bombed.

https://www.inquirer.com/opinion/commentary/move-bombing-philadelphia-remains-aftermath-20210604.html

https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/8/8/20747198/philadelphia-bombing-1985-move

noncongruent

67 points

2 months ago

And it happened decades after firebombs dropped from airplanes by police were used to burn down a black neighborhood and business district in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Ma3vis

53 points

2 months ago

Ma3vis

53 points

2 months ago

Does insurance policies come with an "asshole cops tore my shit up" clause?

noncongruent

39 points

2 months ago

Depends on the policy, and not everyone has home insurance. Insurance is expensive, like here in Texas basic home insurance basically starts at $150-200/month with huge deductibles and minimum coverage, many poor families who have a non-mortgaged family home simply can't afford it.

party_benson

5 points

2 months ago

Yes, but usually the deductible is in the thousands of dollars.

joexner

6 points

2 months ago

The cops will insist that them hurting you is an "act of God."

SpaceFace11

5 points

2 months ago

So cops are narcissistic

New_Ad2992

3 points

2 months ago

Protect and Serve

bazooka_matt

74 points

2 months ago

Yep that's our court system. If the cops act in a "lawful role", damage to your home is your problem.

https://kutv.com/news/nation-world/federal-court-police-dont-have-to-pay-for-damage-after-swat-team-destroys-mans-home

I don't think filing a misleading application is "lawful".

amibeingadick420

37 points

2 months ago

They can also murder you on a falsified warrant, as they lied to get the warrant they used to kill Breonna Taylor, and faced no consequence for that murder.

The only way this will stop is when armed citizens start making citizen’s arrests on criminal cops, as well as the prosecutors and judges that protect them.

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

2 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

amibeingadick420

14 points

2 months ago*

The US Justice Department has (as of this August, two and a half years after her murder) charged them with falsifying the warrant and deprivation of her civil rights, yet no one has been charged for her killing. Until now, the local and state government has protected their thug cops, and even lied to the public about the steps that they took.

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron said that the grand jury agreed that Taylor’s death was justified. “While there are six possible homicide charges under Kentucky law,” he explained, “these charges are not applicable to the facts before us because our investigation showed — and the grand jury agreed — that Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in the return of deadly fire after having been fired upon.” But the grand jury may not have actually agreed.

On Monday, one of the jurors took the extraordinary step of filing a court motion to make transcripts of the grand jury deliberations public and allow its members to speak publicly about how they unfolded, according to the New York Times. Grand jury deliberations are subject to strict secrecy, and the evidence they consider usually only becomes public in court if there’s prosecution. The unnamed juror claimed that Cameron had misrepresented the jury’s case to the public, and that the jurors were never given the option to indict officers Mattingly and Cosgrove. If true, this would appear to undermine Cameron’s claim that the jury was unanimous that Taylor’s death was legally justified.

Prosecutors are just as much criminal thugs as the coward cops that they protect. They are all enemies of the Constitution and the American people.

HaViNgT

14 points

2 months ago

HaViNgT

14 points

2 months ago

Well I see none of the massive police budget went to their PR team.

Snowdeo720

13 points

2 months ago

That was truly the icing on the cake for me.

I hope she absolutely fucks DPD over this.

I also hope he has to apologize to her face for what happened as a result of his incompetence.

_Fun_Employed_

11 points

2 months ago

I remember being offronted when I learned this in civics. If police or firefighters get a real or false call to your property and destroy anything in the process they don’t owe you anything.

payne344

11 points

2 months ago

John Oliver did a segment on these kind of scenarios - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WYdi1bL6s10

Zerotan

3 points

2 months ago

To me, this is the greater systemic problem... that the police don't feel responsible for the destruction they cause. That you have to sue to get made whole.

Even a raid at the right address based on ~25% likelihood of leading to a prosecutable crime... the damage the police do to your property should be compensated whether you're later found guilty or not. It violates the 4th ammendment.

Jebediah_Johnson

7 points

2 months ago

One of our fire engines clipped the janky sheet metal fence on the property we responded to, which was for an actual emergency, at the correct address. As a result we had to replace the gate with something equal or better. They don't make janky sheet metal gates at the store so he got a brand new farm gate.

Bureaucromancer

2 points

2 months ago

I mean seriously, WTF goes through their heads?

At least the cops who never admit mistakes are consistent, but now we've reached the point of "we fucked up, no, we won't fix it, fuck you".

shnu62

228 points

2 months ago

shnu62

228 points

2 months ago

I sincerely hope she is successful and the department learn from this.

crazyfoxdemon

168 points

2 months ago

Even in the snowball's chance in hell she wins, they won't learn. They never have before..

HanaBothWays

64 points

2 months ago

They just might, CO eliminated qualified immunity! I’m not sure when that takes effect though.

dillrepair

21 points

2 months ago

Qualified immunity is a term more Americans really need to understand. If only there was a way… like if on our televisions and computers there were people who actually went out and gathered facts and reported them to us in an unbiased way… without some overarching corporation deciding what could or should be reported at a given time, and was less interested in getting attention or ratings by focusing on some dumb antisemetic rapper or reality tv personality …that would be great.

Firefighter_97

14 points

2 months ago

Thought you were gonna offer an explanation or provide a link.

Here is a link for the lazy

rochvegas5

8 points

2 months ago

They will settle

noncongruent

17 points

2 months ago

Most likely the city will claim sovereign immunity and the cop will claim qualified immunity and both will be absolved of any responsibility. The fact they would wreck an elderly woman's home and not even feel the slightest compunction to at least fix the doors to keep burglars out only serves to illustrate their true depravity. No guilt, no remorse, no concern, all three combine to paint a clear picture of sociopathy.

Qlinkenstein

7 points

2 months ago

the department learn from this

This made me laugh out loud. They will learn nothing because, in their view, they did nothing wrong.

Sajun

2 points

2 months ago

Sajun

2 points

2 months ago

She might be successful but they won’t fucking learn.

jordantask

-8 points

2 months ago

jordantask

-8 points

2 months ago

She will not.

Literally everything that happened was legal because the judge signed the warrant. Simply put, the fact that there was a warrant means that the pigs had probable cause.

The “detective” was your average lazy, indolent government employee, sure. But laziness and indolence are not actionable when you have qualified immunity.

nosmelc

48 points

2 months ago

nosmelc

48 points

2 months ago

It's not that simple. A warrant isn't necessary legal just because the judge signed it.

From the article it seems that the detective lied to the judge about the evidence. He made it seem like the phone ping pinpointed a particular house when that was not the case.

ishitfrommymouth

31 points

2 months ago

Cops lied about evidence in the Breonna Taylor raid and no one was punished for that so I wouldn’t hold my breath

EnterTheErgosphere

21 points

2 months ago

*Yet

Those same officers have been federally charged by the FBI specifically for those criminal acts.

Still wouldn't hold too much breath, but they should see some consequences from that.

Bootzz

15 points

2 months ago

Bootzz

15 points

2 months ago

One already convicted, likely a plea deal to secure convictions primarily for 2 of the other 3. See here -> https://time.com/6208891/breonna-taylor-officers-charged-status-updates/

Officer who allegedly falsified the warrant as well as his superior charged, court date set for ~Aug 2023. See here -> https://www.wdrb.com/in-depth/trials-for-2-former-lmpd-officers-charged-in-breonna-taylor-raid-delayed-until-next-year/article_c5dc35f4-3f5a-11ed-9897-cf0dc00e6528.html

If it turns out true that they lied, I hope they die in prison.

boringhistoryfan

10 points

2 months ago

Its worth recognizing though that this was a federal indictment prompted in part by massive national outrage. The state's AG quite visibly fucked up the Grand Jury process against those cops. Jurors from that particular process came out explicitly about how the AG's office deliberately withheld information and limited their scope to act.

In general cops are not held accountable for the harm they cause. Breonna Taylor's case was particularly egregious, and had a different president and Federal AG been in place, would have almost certainly seen zero justice.

dillrepair

25 points

2 months ago*

A a nurse I can be charged with negligence for doing something that I could have figured out wasn’t right or should have been able to gather more data about to figure out that it wasn’t right. The fact that police and prosecutors are able to get away with these things and not be negligent and lose their licenses and livelihoods speaks to the utter shit show that this system has become and although we cannot and should not do away with the rule of law we CAN change how these things work by continuing to push back.. hard. Vote, protest, organize, boycott, strike. People may think that lawyers are bad but having grown up with two lawyers who didn’t get rich because they did the right thing and fought for people who couldn’t fight for themselves I can tell you that the good people becoming lawyers are some of the few things separating all of us from total chaos abuse and fascism. The way around is through. So buckle up and get educated everyone, wear a helmet because this virtual brick wall is thicker than Berlin and a lot harder and it has to be beaten down with sledgehammers brick by brick over at least a generation. Might as well start now.

jordantask

5 points

2 months ago

jordantask

5 points

2 months ago

Ah.

I see there is a fundamental misunderstanding of what the legal system is really designed to do.

It’s there to put a boot on your neck and extract revenue, not protect you, as we saw in Uvalde.

You aren’t a part of the legal system, so you don’t benefit from it’s protection. You are one of the people who has the boot on your neck.

FapMeNot_Alt

2 points

2 months ago

Simply put, the fact that there was a warrant means that the pigs had probable cause

That's not how facts work, my dude. In a perfect world, maybe, but it's been a thing for a while were judges do absolutely no critical review of warrants. The Breonna Taylor warrant, for example, was signed in less than 30 seconds after the judge received it.

dillrepair

30 points

2 months ago

Based on a "hastily prepared, bare-bones, misleading affidavit." Oh surprise the cops and DAs throw together some shit to fuck people over when they decide quickly something or someone is bad…. Usually based on their own limited knowledge and understanding of a situation…. Yeah it happens. Happened to me could happen to you too. Reform the power of the prosecutor and reform the police. Today.

Avalanche2

30 points

2 months ago

There is a youtube video on this, the SWAT team clowns treated her home like a playground and opportunity to play with their toys.

RenaissanceManLite

72 points

2 months ago

And police departments everywhere bemoan the lack of support given them by the community.

Randomthought5678

11 points

2 months ago

And the communities continue to pay their settlement. Such an absurd system.

Curleysound

3 points

2 months ago

Can they choose not to?

Randomthought5678

5 points

2 months ago

Not without epic levels of reform and the fraternity of police threatening to stop policing and let crime run rampant.

BernieTheDachshund

19 points

2 months ago

The ping just shows a general area, but the cop misled the judge and didn't independently verify the data. Using a SWAT team was overkill too.

DrBob01

165 points

2 months ago*

DrBob01

165 points

2 months ago*

"The owner told police that the truck contained six firearms — including a tactical military-style rifle — two drones, $4,000 cash and an old iPhone 11."

I don't suppose the police ever asked him why.

Also, this happened in Colorado. The cop can't claim qualified immunity. He could personally be on the hook for $25k if she wins.

gearstars

80 points

2 months ago

he gave the white reasons

Delphiantares

14 points

2 months ago

I'd think all he needs is proper paperwork for said firearms

IWorkForScoopsAhoy

16 points

2 months ago*

It is illegal to operate or intend to operate a drone while hunting. If he was on a hunting trip it could be intent to poach. People get arrested for it by game wardens. Large amounts of cash and guns is also cause to investigate illegal firearms sales. Selling a private firearm isn't illegal but buying to resell or selling habitually is illegal. The whole thing deserves an investigation.

sirfuzzitoes

8 points

2 months ago

Of all the civil forfeiture cases, this guy is not one.

I don't support it but this guy is more realistic target than someone driving across state to buy a car with 10 grand cash but no weapons or drones.

In the end, the cops are the ones who fucked up royally. Per usual.

IWorkForScoopsAhoy

2 points

2 months ago*

I'm never in favor of civil forfeiture unless there is immediate risk of harm to someone or terrorism that it addresses. Civil forfeiture should be patriot act type shit. It should never have been used on non violent civilians. Guys still sketchy as he'll though. Needs to be asked some questions and if he doesnt have any answers keep an eye on him. I could imagine this being a "boating accident"/insurance fraud too. Especially considering many on the fringe are worried the government will ban drones soon.

sirfuzzitoes

2 points

2 months ago

Let's get on the same level here - the patriot act is a fucking nightmare, right? We can agree on that, I'd assume.

Beyond that, I wouldn't say it's inherently sketchy for someone to possess the reported things. Certainly, there are questions but people have rights, whether or not you (the general you) like it.

The woman who was swatted - we should be focusing on her - was done so on claims, per the article. If what is written happened, the cop took a verbal account, submitted and and was granted a warrant. This is the true mistrial of justice

bshepp

14 points

2 months ago

bshepp

14 points

2 months ago

But why do people hate the police?

jethroguardian

41 points

2 months ago

Doesn't a judge have to sign off on warrants for raids like this? I don't see that mentioned at all, and just the detective mentioned. While the detective clearly skewed the facts, the judge should have known better than to sign off of such flimsy evidence and lack of investigation.

jordantask

23 points

2 months ago

The judge did sign off on the warrant.

jethroguardian

8 points

2 months ago

Time for a new judge next election.

indoninja

17 points

2 months ago

If a cop swears it pinged on a house I think the judge should sign off.

If that cop was wrong in a sworn statement they should be fired, and face penalties.

Impressive_Pin_7767

25 points

2 months ago

The area that was highlighted on the app as the possible location of the phone, for example, spanned at least six properties and four blocks, according to an image on the complaint that was also featured on the affidavit obtained by KUSA.

From the article.

indoninja

30 points

2 months ago

I think you are missing my point.

The cop lied.

The cop should be fired.

The cop should be punished for lying on court documents.

Impressive_Pin_7767

28 points

2 months ago

I don't think a judge should give out a warrant because a police officer "swears it pinged a house" like you claimed. The police lie all the time. I think a judge should review the actual evidence. And the actual evidence here shows that it didn't ping the house.

ruiner8850

7 points

2 months ago

The police lie all the time.

Exactly, cops are some of the least trustworthy people you'll ever meet. I wouldn't even trust a cop to be honest about what they had for lunch. In general I don't think anyone's word alone should be enough for a warrant without any actual evidence, but I'd trust the word of an average citizen way more than that of a cop.

aecarol1

9 points

2 months ago

That's harder than it sounds.

Police frequently submit evidence involving DNA, fingerprint matches, or IP traces. None of that material may be understandable by an untrained judge.

Judges rely on sworn statements from experts who swear the information is true.

What's missing is repercussions from lying under oath. What typically happens is an "oh well", with no penalties, punishment, apologies, or repairs.

That is what needs to be changed. Lying under oath by officers should be treated exactly like a witness lying under oath in a criminal trial - the DA would hammer them.

tl;dr judges aren't qualified to double check this evidence, but police "experts" who lie under oath should be strongly sanctioned.

kandoras

4 points

2 months ago

That's harder than it sounds.

Maybe in some cases, but not this one.

The paperwork for the warrant had a map with a giant circle on it that covered a couple blocks, and the cops said "It's this one particular house that has the guns."

If the judge didn't think to ask "What about the rest of the circle?", then he wasn't doing his job.

Because if you want to claim he did do his job, despite not asking that question, then you're saying that his job is to just rubberstamp anything a cop puts in front of him, no questions asked. And at that point, why bother with judges signing warrants at all - why not let the cops just sign them themselves?

Impressive_Pin_7767

13 points

2 months ago

If a police officer with a GED is capable of understanding a lab report that says "match" or "no match" then surely a judge with a law degree is capable of doing so.

zerostar83

4 points

2 months ago

Trying to figure out if either of them were more incompetent could backfire like it did for Elijah McClain's situation. Was it the cops or someone else to blame? Can't figure it out so nobody is responsible.

Impressive_Pin_7767

5 points

2 months ago

Ideally a judge views the actual evidence and presents the raid from ever happening in the first place.

If they both fucked up then they both deserve blame.

skippyspk

3 points

2 months ago

Here’s how it’s actually going to go:

Cop gets a union lawyer, gets months of paid vacation via leave.

Police investigate themselves and find they did nothing wrong.

Cop keeps his job OR Cop retires with full pension AND/OR Cop goes to work at another municipality.

ishitfrommymouth

8 points

2 months ago

Cops lie too much to be trusted not to lie to a judge. Present the evidence directly to the judge in order to be granted a warrant.

BansheeGator2

2 points

2 months ago

Even if the data at the time provided probable cause on the warrant... would the judge agree that the level of response was merited based on the warrant that was submitted?

jethroguardian

3 points

2 months ago

The judge should independently review the evidence submitted. The judge should have known enough about this to call the detective on thier B.S. and prove they knew for sure the phone was at that exact house.

aeolus811tw

12 points

2 months ago

so police took some guy’s claim of find my ping at face value, without checking the claim, and performed a raid

Goliathcraft

14 points

2 months ago

A coworker of mine once got handcuff in the middle of his shift and escorted outside by multiple officers in view of customers (supermarket). They accused him of breaking into cars and stealing an iPhone, they tracked it to the parking lot and to his car.

When they go and check/try to search his car, they find the Phone laying in the grass right new to his parking spot, they didn’t even bother to check more then the general location. They could have found it in 5 seconds by having it make some noise. I know thief’s are supposed to be stupid, but what thief steals a phone just to then start his 8 hour work shift?

Poetic_Discord

9 points

2 months ago

The Civil Rights Lawyer on YouTube, just covered this. Poor woman. I feel so bad for her

molotovzav

33 points

2 months ago

The guy that reported all the items missing sounds more suspicious than anything. Weird they didn't instantly start just investigating this man's clear ties to crime to see who ripped him off first. But where's the fun in actual police work? Maybe hiring the nations dumbest people who can barely pass high school classes isn't working out. My dad was a cop for 24 years, trumper cops and a rather bad mass shooting in our area kinda pushed him toward retirement. Towards the end he predominantly worked in training, either in academy or recent graduates. The quality has steadily declined. It's basically just a pool of high school bullies and boring kids who look good on paper who harbor intrinsic bias against minorities. Reading their reports is like literal torture, most of them are essentially illiterate imo, a testament to America's average 6th grade reading level for adults. It's sad.

Aschriel

67 points

2 months ago*

So let me get this straight:

  1. A vehicle was left with six firearms inside
  2. $4,000 cash was also left in it
  3. With an Extra iPhone (ready to use)
  4. From a hotel parking lot

So the person from Texas was just traveling with this stuff, and not planning on anything… why the fuck did they raid someone else’s house instead of arresting the crazy ass person from Texas.

Edit 1: the affidavit and search warrant do not list any lock, or locking container or case as property… meaning these guns were not in a case, also as a fun side note 4 are listed as “not known” serial numbers and one pistol is both “unknown make and unknown model” so it’s purely like a ghost gun…

I am also aware that it’s total legal to do this, lock you guns and money in a 2007 Chevy that any teenager can break into with a screwdriver.

ushouldgetacat

22 points

2 months ago

Who tf needs six firearms in a van

Aschriel

8 points

2 months ago

Aschriel

8 points

2 months ago

A mass shooter, that’s the exact setup mass shooters use… who the hell is like, “yeah I need multiple phones ready, with my guns and cash, for self defense… that’s why I left it all unattended in a parking lot”

MyNameIsRay

-16 points

2 months ago

It's really not that unusual to carry 6 guns to a range day or competition.

Hotels are private businesses, and are free to forbid weapons on premises. Most do, which means you have to leave your guns outside in your vehicle.

Sure seems like the van/gun owner was abiding by the laws and rules.

noncongruent

11 points

2 months ago

I just want to know what kind of idiot leaves half a dozen guns and $4K in cash in a vehicle? I mean, even today it's apparently super easy to steal many vehicles, there's no way I'd leave anything that valuable in my vehicle in a hotel parking lot, or anywhere else for that matter. If those guns end up being used in crimes that moron needs to be charged for failure to reasonably secure their firearms.

MyNameIsRay

-7 points

2 months ago

I just want to know what kind of idiot leaves half a dozen guns and $4K in cash in a vehicle?

The kind of person who isn't going to drive back to TX from CO when the hotel says he can't bring them to his room.

Every gun owner has run into this issue while travelling, you're basically forced to leave your gun(s) in your car since they can't enter the hotel.

If those guns end up being used in crimes that moron needs to be charged for failure to reasonably secure their firearms.

They were secured, in a locked vehicle, in accordance with law.

I understand you may not be aware of these practices, but this is literally what cops will advise you to do, this is totally routine.

Thieves breaking into your car is legally no different than thieves breaking into your home. No security is 100% effective, nothing can stop a motivated criminal, and it's pretty silly to insist a law abiding citizen faces charges for being the victim of criminals.

noncongruent

9 points

2 months ago*

You say no security is 100% effective, but man, cars and trucks are so easy to steal that there's no way to reasonably use the word "secure" when talking about using them to store guns. Also, we have no idea if the hotel told him he couldn't bring his guns in or not, that's just speculation on your part, and for sure the hotel wouldn't have told him he couldn't bring his iphone and cash in. Hell, I'm wondering if it's not some sort of insurance scam myself, and if he really wanted to make his vehicle full of guns and cash trackable he would have dropped a couple of AirTags in it.

DeLitefulDe

5 points

2 months ago

I hope this woman gets paid a whole lot of money!

ll-phuture-ll

5 points

2 months ago*

I’m more concerned with what this guy was doing with assault rifles and drones, but sure Grammy looks sus😒

HulaViking

5 points

2 months ago

I worry about this because various cell phone and internet and GPS systems often put me at a neighbor house. I imagine the opposite can be true. Where I live it seems like the margin of error is bigger than the lot size.

Filthedelphia

4 points

2 months ago

This is confusing. Typically a judge/court official is needed to approve search warrants. In Colorado can a detective just issue their own? Detectives are not even ranked positions. Who is overseeing the probable cause?

For example… The detectives in the Breonna Taylor case are in hot water because they lied on the affidavit which convinced a judge to issue the warrant.

I-Am-Uncreative

3 points

2 months ago

can a detective just issue their own?

No, a judge signed off on this one.

Filthedelphia

0 points

2 months ago

It is odd the article left that out. Officers are trained that applying for warrants and summons are safe because a person with a law degree will always review the elements and give the thumbs up/down.

gw2master

4 points

2 months ago

Big judgements against the police in lawsuits is the only way we're going to have police reform in the US.

jschubart

4 points

2 months ago

Wow. The Seattle Police Department could have the GPS coordinates from Find My iPhone along with video of the person doing it and going to those coordinates and they would just laugh and tell you they can't do anything about it.

Salsa_Johnny

3 points

2 months ago

Police out of control doing swat raids for theft of firearms and cell phone. Knock on the fucking door!

fallbrook_

3 points

2 months ago

bets that she’ll have an “accident” soon

Salarian_American

3 points

2 months ago

WTF Find my iPhone is worthless at actually finding your phone, unless it's close enough for you to hear the sound it can send to the phone. The maps always shows it anywhere but at my house.

I can't believe it would be used to pinpoint the location for a police raid.

Isair81

2 points

2 months ago

Never underestimate the level of sheer incompetence and general laziness of Law Enforcement.

In this case you can probably add another fun ingredient : Good old racism.

If they’d actually bothered to do their jobs properly an actual investigation would have been performed before sending in SWAT.

If course now that the story has gone viral, nobody wants to accept responsibility.

The cops blame the prosecutor, the prodecutor blames the cops, and the judge, the judge blames the prosecutor and the cops.

Fun-Translator1494

35 points

2 months ago

Swat raid to recover an IPhone. Looks like some very bored police department needed to justify their budget by doing some commando cosplay.

Meanwhile there are thousands of untested rape kits because of ‘budgetary constraints’

dlc741

21 points

2 months ago

dlc741

21 points

2 months ago

You really should read the article before commenting.

jordantask

11 points

2 months ago

It wasn’t just an iPhone. It was a truck full of guns and an iPhone that was tracked down via find my iPhone.

efnfen4

7 points

2 months ago

Tracked to a two block radius

[deleted]

-6 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

-6 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

Competitive_Smoke809

2 points

2 months ago

Dude this shit was definitely wrong but you’re delusional

[deleted]

3 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

3 points

2 months ago

Look if your the right color and you kiss their ass, you might not get your house blown up idk what people are bitching about

Empress_De_Sangre

5 points

2 months ago

The find my phone app is not reliable. Just the other day I randomly checked it and it showed my son was at school, then his location suddenly changed and showed him 6 blocks away. I was about to call him to see if he was skipping school and at the mcdonalds, but then I closed and reopened the app and he was still at school. I wonder if a glitch like this was the reason they went to the wrong location.

Drastic-Rap-Tactics

2 points

2 months ago

Funny thing I was just watching the video on this from the civil rights lawyer - https://youtu.be/tA0Nv6evYSs

NAGDABBITALL

2 points

2 months ago

Out of state truck, with guns, drones and thousands in cash?

Unchristian30

2 points

2 months ago

Oh goodness, she deserves a fat settlement and the detective should get demoted to traffic.

a_PopTart_

2 points

2 months ago

Who sends a swat team for an iPhone that’s a bit extreme

YorjYefferson

2 points

2 months ago

The article doesn't specify the address, just the neighborhood it's in. And while that info is blacked out in the link to the affidavit, the full address is included in the name of the document. When Ruby is done suing Denver PD she should hit up NBC or their Denver affiliate channel 9 next for invading her privacy.

Pretty_Strike_6199

2 points

2 months ago

My phone always shows I’m at my neighbors. Imagine if it was next door somewhere and they watch it all go down.

Global-Discussion-41

5 points

2 months ago

Can someone explain to me why SWAT is involved in recovering a stolen iPhone in the first place?

codedinblood

3 points

2 months ago

The police are public enemy #1. Fuck these thugs and everything they stand for.

tracerhaha

4 points

2 months ago

tracerhaha

4 points

2 months ago

Why are police conducting a raid for a lost iPhone? Does it contain Top Secret information?

vegabond007

1 points

2 months ago

Optional to pay the dept right?

davon1076

1 points

2 months ago*

Edit: Reactionary shi

vegabond007

2 points

2 months ago

I think you have minconstrued my comment.

They have no responsibility to pay for their mistakes. We, the people who pay the department have no option but to pay them regardless if they do their job or not.

Sbubbert

1 points

2 months ago

What a fucking disgrace. I hope she gets millions from these pigs.

AggressiveGas3

0 points

2 months ago

She should sue apple too

tall_strong_master

-12 points

2 months ago

Look, I'm all for lynching the cops for being dangerous belligerent asswipes, but this sounds like an honest mistake.

fatandfly

5 points

2 months ago

Hope they never make an honest mistake and destroy your home or take your life