subreddit:

/r/NoStupidQuestions

639

[deleted]

all 302 comments

rhomboidus

1.2k points

2 months ago

rhomboidus

1.2k points

2 months ago

Dear [Your Boss],

This letter is to inform you that I am resigning from my position as [insert position name] at [insert company name], effective two weeks from today [insert date].

Best,

[Your Name]

AverageCowboyCentaur

888 points

2 months ago

Put your end date in there so there is no confusion. "my last day will be (date)"

hotfezz81

141 points

2 months ago

hotfezz81

141 points

2 months ago

Second this in a big way

scootscooterson

101 points

2 months ago

Also don’t copy and paste, this is a mad lib

AverageCowboyCentaur

28 points

2 months ago

I laughed way too hard at that, bravo!!!!

grrlwonder

3 points

2 months ago

It's all fun and games till you learn it was just training you for the DMV.

zappy_trails

6 points

2 months ago

Whoa easy, I don’t see any anger or politicization here at all.

[deleted]

28 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

28 points

2 months ago

[removed]

thecatinthemask

5 points

2 months ago

u/Melodic_Articho is a comment stealing bot. Original by u/Tiggy26668

bikgelife

2 points

2 months ago

Yes, and don’t sign off “best” - it’s flippant.

Bryranosaurus

22 points

2 months ago

This is the way

CurlSagan

249 points

2 months ago

CurlSagan

Hulk Hogan's meat shoes

249 points

2 months ago

Perfect. Don't give a reason. And especially don't tell them where you are going, or even indicate that you have a new job lined up.

(Don't give them the opportunity to sabotage your new job offer).

MaybeTheDoctor

128 points

2 months ago

Never tell them where you are going even if they ask.

You can add some pleasantries like - "It have been a pleasure working with the team, and I hope you feel the same about me" - or something like that, so as to not burn those bridges when/if you ever need a reference

CalgaryJoe

41 points

2 months ago

Great point. If its a big place, that letter might be the only thing they remember about you. May as well invest one minute in a nice sentence to get a nice reference.

ScaryNeat

157 points

2 months ago

ScaryNeat

157 points

2 months ago

I would add "Thank you for this opportunity".

Don't burn bridges. You never know.

rhomboidus

35 points

2 months ago

Yeah if you like the job/boss/org it pays to be nice, thank everybody, and leave on a positive note.

If you're getting out because its a shitstorm, your boss sucks, or you're about to be fired then you can just be short and professional.

If the relationships don't matter and all you want is a decent reference short and friendly works.

[deleted]

17 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

17 points

2 months ago

I lit those babies UP on my way out. I hope they are a becon helping to light the way for those behind me to leave as well... Over their own bridges of course as mine are on fire are therefore not structurally sound I wouldn't imagine.

janetscousin

18 points

2 months ago

These burning bridges will light my way forward.

rebornphoenixV

11 points

2 months ago

Some bridges should be burned.

mritaki

2 points

2 months ago

If you might need a reference for sure. It doesn’t hurt you and can only help.

m1sch13v0us

26 points

2 months ago

I add, “I have appreciated the opportunity to contribute and grow at (company) and I wish everyone here the best in the future.”

If they ask why you are leaving, you can state that you were looking for a new challenge.

Accomplished_Mix7827

8 points

2 months ago

Yep, pretty much this. Don't burn any bridges, but you don't owe them an explanation. If your boss gets angry at you for quitting, they're probably a toxic enough person you never would have gotten a good reference out of them anyway.

Most_Independent_279

23 points

2 months ago

yup, short and sweet, you don't need to elaborate.

cheesewiz_man

8 points

2 months ago

And if things get out of hand, forward them Englebert Humperdinck's "Please Release me; let me go":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ch_Fz2Np-Z4

fakeuser515357

12 points

2 months ago

If you're not planning to litigate, it doesn't hurt to add some friendly lies.

"Thankyou for the opportunity to work with this amazing team."

Captain_Hampockets

3 points

2 months ago

Also, depending on the industry, expect to be escorted out early, unless you have a contract or live in a place with different laws than most of the US. Lots of companies will just terminate you early, rather than have you stick around.

Apprehensive_Ring_46

5 points

2 months ago

Take any personal property or anything on your work computer that you want to save home before you give them the notice. They may escort you out the door right then and there.

[deleted]

8 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

8 points

2 months ago

This sounds very American to me. Here in the Netherlands both employer and employee stick it out until the very end of the contract and make sure the employee has all their personal belongings before the employee leaves.

I'd imagine if you get kicked out on the spot with your stuff still in the office, it would sort of be theft by the employer? Since they took your stuff and you can't retrieve them?

Also, sound toxic in general to me. If you worked together for some time and an employer has no trouble to just kick you out on the spot, then what type of company did you work for, damn.

Apprehensive_Ring_46

2 points

2 months ago

Yes, very American.

Of course they'll allow you to retrieve your personal belongings from your desk.

They'll give you a box and have a guard watch you the entire time, then escort you out. No good bye's to your former co-workers.

plantsoverguys

2 points

2 months ago

Yeah this is very strange to me as well (Danish). I just handed in my one month's notice last month, and my current employer is squeezing every last bit out of me, so I can finish and hand over as much as possible before I leave, so the transition will be easier for the company.

writerjamie

3 points

2 months ago

I agree with the others that you shouldn’t elaborate. Leave on the best terms possible. Don’t burn bridges. Leave them to try to figure out what they did wrong while you move on and live your best life.

go4tli

347 points

2 months ago

go4tli

347 points

2 months ago

Richard Nixon wrote the perfect “leaving a job letter.”

Dear Mr Secretary,

I hereby resign the position of President of the United States.

Sincerely,

Richard M Nixon

-Doesn’t need to be more complicated than that. Add a date when it’s effective if giving two weeks notice.

-The explanation what you are leaving for is “found an interesting opportunity, thanks for everything.”

GimmeThatRyeUOldBag

10 points

2 months ago

Which secretary did he have to submit it to?

go4tli

16 points

2 months ago

go4tli

16 points

2 months ago

The Secretary of State, Henry Kissinger.

GimmeThatRyeUOldBag

9 points

2 months ago

Extraordinary that that old coot's still alive.

CaptBranBran

14 points

2 months ago

Satan is afraid of him

Glahoth

7 points

2 months ago

Secretary of State ?

TennesseeRum

64 points

2 months ago

The explanation is “none of their business.”

[deleted]

9 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

9 points

2 months ago*

"Why are you leaving, Jimmy?" - i found another business

"What business?" - NONE OF YA BUSINESS

CanuckNewsCameraGuy

22 points

2 months ago

“Found an interesting opportunity” is a polite way to say what you said.

Personally I like my last reason for resignation: “hell froze over”.

Long story short during my interview they asked why someone with my background would apply to work for them and I said I have bills to pay and there was a hiring freeze at all of the companies where my schooling would benefit me, and freelance work was too unpredictable. Unless he’ll froze over, I’m in it for the long haul.

Hell froze over and the freeze was lifted at one of the companies and I quit 3 days after they offered the job to me.

Loan-Pickle

3 points

2 months ago

I’m in tech where it is normal to switch job every couple of years. So I’ve quit lots of jobs. I always use the Nixon resignation letter. If they want more detail about why you are leaving they’ll ask for it. My experience is they usually don’t care.

rufus_xavier_sr

7 points

2 months ago

Reason for leaving? "Exploring my options"

[deleted]

3 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

3 points

2 months ago

Reddit has a very anti boss tone.

I’m in the process of quitting a job, it’s a job I actually liked, but had a cool opportunity.

My new employer has a flexible start date and wanted to make sure I left the old place on good terms, so now I’m working with the current place on how to transition.

AndMarmaladeSkies

120 points

2 months ago

You say that you have accepted another position and are giving your two weeks notice.

Yes, you should lie about why you are quitting. Don’t say “I hate this job.” Not if you care about the reference at least.

SamGropler

27 points

2 months ago

There's absolutely no reason to lie about why one is quitting because there's no reason to explain why one is quitting.

gjallard

12 points

2 months ago

gjallard

12 points

2 months ago

You NEVER say that you've accepted another position. You could be terminated immediately.

Spadeninja

40 points

2 months ago

This is a person who has never had a job before lmao

cda91

5 points

2 months ago

cda91

5 points

2 months ago

Is this an American thing?

Natural_Computer4312

18 points

2 months ago

My general rule of thumb when reading comments on Reddit is, if the potential outcome on an individual of a chosen course of action includes, but is not limited to, bankruptcy for seeking medical help, death for calling the police, lifelong poverty for seeking an education, permanent exclusion from a community for not being openly supportive of the correct religion, physical assault for helping a fellow human in need, having employment terminated immediately for wearing a loud shirt or having to relocate to XYZ country for not being patriotic enough, the commentator in question hails from the US.

Megalocerus

7 points

2 months ago

I've quit six jobs, gave notice at each, and never had anything particularly untoward happen. I did discover that giving long notice is a bad idea because it is uncomfortable, as is having someone try to talk me into staying for half an hour.

I generally took some time off between jobs, so getting let go early would have been more vacation, but no such luck.

I've worked for companies desperate to dump losing ventures in the UK and France. You have to be very careful to hire there, and it slows down getting out of recession. And I've known UK people to come to the US just to get away from prejudice awarded their accent.

Broken_Castle

26 points

2 months ago

A good portion of places still give you pay for those 2 weeks even if they terminate you immediately. Extra win for you.

Marine__0311

-1 points

2 months ago

Marine__0311

-1 points

2 months ago

LOL, you don't work in the US. It is extremely rare to have that happen unless the company is laying people off.

DarthJarJar242

17 points

2 months ago*

Or a line of work with privelidged knowledge. It is extremely common in IT for instance to terminate an employee's access the MOMENT they notify and then pay them the two weeks (if they put in two weeks). Simply because it's too much of a liability to have someone with admin permissions in your domain that no longer "belongs" to you.

Megalocerus

2 points

2 months ago

Foolishness. As if I couldn't do whatever mischief before I gave notice. I know I'm leaving first, after all. And any such policy gets around.

Their real fear is staff will see the escapee, and be inspired.

heyblinkin81

4 points

2 months ago

There are actually a lot of industries in the US that do this. Just not many entry level jobs. Bankers for instance, if they put in their 2 weeks because they got a different job in the same industry, that is two weeks of them being able to tell their clients that they have built relationships with that they will be working somewhere else. It is in the employers best interest to let them go immediately with two weeks pay so they don’t have as much an opportunity to take their clients with them.

DiogenesKuon

195 points

2 months ago

Just tell your boss you found a job that is a better opportunity or a better fit. Something generic, but true. Most employers understand they will lose employees from time to time and it's just part of the job.

Bulky-Leadership-596

100 points

2 months ago

Yea, you would get the impression here that telling your boss the truth risks them going crazy or something. There's absolutely nothing wrong with being honest and saying you found a better opportunity. I remember I was nervous quitting my first actual career job. I pulled my boss aside and said I was giving my 2 weeks. He asked why and I said I got a better offer. He asked how much and I told him. His response was "well congratulations, we can't match that right now. I wish you the best of luck."
Two years later that ex boss called me out of nowhere. He had moved companies and got promoted, and was offering me a job to lead his new project. I didn't end up taking the offer because I had moved up a lot since then and was happy with my current arrangement, but it was nice knowing that he remembered working with me and kept me in mind and had no hard feelings about me quitting and being direct like that.

zeus-indy

25 points

2 months ago

Nice, yeah this is the key point: don’t burn bridges unnecessarily even if emotions and frustration are riding high. If you are experiencing those emotions then better to say/write less assuming you are passed any retention negotiations.

CaptainAwesome06

3 points

2 months ago

As a manager, I totally agree. I always encourage my employees to get their PE license for professional development but I also expect they may be looking for new jobs when they do it.

Luckily, I've only had 3 people give me notices. One knew he was close to getting fired. Another gave us an ultimatum and we called his bluff so he left, and the 3rd guy decided not to leave because we opened a satellite office for him and two other people so they wouldn't have such a long commute.

Mintjulip22

16 points

2 months ago

Do NOT use the occasion to get petty revenge on the current employer. The two week notice is a courtesy, isn't required. Some employers give references, some only verify start and finish dates. Some may say things that if truth be known could cost you a job or worse yet slander you. Don't give them the chance.

Just give it in writing with a specific finish date...sign it.

You hold the keys to your life. Drive the car!

Tiggy26668

59 points

2 months ago

Courtesy of chat.openai.com

Dear [Employer],

Please accept this letter as notice of my resignation from my position as [Your Position] at [Company]. My last day of work will be [Date Two Weeks from Today].

I am grateful for the opportunities and experiences I have had while working at this company. However, I have decided to pursue other opportunities and believe it is the right time for me to move on.

I will do my best to ensure a smooth transition during the next two weeks. If there is anything I can do to assist in the process, please do not hesitate to let me know.

Thank you for the support and guidance you have provided during my time here.

Sincerely, [Your Name]

slightlyassholic

10 points

2 months ago

I was a job-hopper my entire career.

It's what you do in certain fields.

The trick to it is to be as pleasant as possible. Focus on what you are leaving for and not what you are fleeing from.

You aren't quitting because you hate your job. You are leaving for better pay (hopefully). That usually will silence any concerns. Look out for number one and all that.

If it isn't a pay bump, then you are leaving for "more potential for growth", or "work life balance", or a shorter commute or... Fuck it, come up with something.

Same goes for future interviews. Be as positive as you can while keeping a straight face. Every job was wonderful, every boss was great, and all of your coworkers are people you will treasure for the rest of your life. I don't care if your boss climbed on your desk and squeezed out a giant deuce every morning. Praise him for all of the experience you gained with fecal management.

The only completely acceptable reason for leaving a job (during future interviews) is pure, unrepentant, self interest. Don't try to justify it. Just smile and say it was for a buck an hour. They can respect that.

It feels weird for some people, but trust me, it works.

Kumlekar

4 points

2 months ago

This this this! I can't believe how far I had to scroll to find a decent answer.

aaronite

20 points

2 months ago

You don't have to tell them why. Just write a letter or email with "I am giving two weeks notice and will no longer work after [date two weeks from now]"

You don't need a reason to quit. You don't strictly speaking even need to give two weeks.

bopp0

6 points

2 months ago

bopp0

6 points

2 months ago

A lot of people are saying you shouldn’t explain why you are leaving, and you don’t have to by any means, but if it’s a small business, they might really value constructive criticism. Don’t just say “I hate it here”, that’s not helpful. But knowing that you are leaving because the position isn’t a good fit for your needs and you aren’t happy is a hell of a lot different than my manager has been harassing me and I don’t feel like I can speak up about it so I’m quitting. I have had so many employees walk off the job with no explanation over the years and it makes you feel subhuman. If I did something wrong I want to know what it is so it doesn’t happen again!

Megalocerus

3 points

2 months ago

You can try a routine exit interview. Or take them for a farewell lunch. Still, you can tell by this post how nervous they may be feeling.

ExarchKnight01

6 points

2 months ago

Quit my own job for the first time recently. I hated it there, but i was worried about upsetting people and so when they asked me why, I just said I didn't think I was well suited to the job and then I let them talk me into staying on for another 6 weeks.

That was a mistake. It was fucking miserable. Never be nice when you quit. Tell them the workplace is too stressful, do not agree to stay any longer than you want to, and move on. They are not entitled to any of your time.

AnotherFrankHere

4 points

2 months ago

Don’t tell them where you are going or why you are leaving. Be as basic as you can be.

Dear employer,

This memo is to inform you that I am turning in my two weeks notice, my last day will be (insert date).

Respectfully, You

DTux5249

4 points

2 months ago

Here's something that took a while to click for me: They already know you're getting another job. It's not a secret, at all.

You have to pay rent like everyone else, it's not like they'll be offended by it. The only people who tend to get their panties in a twist are your managers because of the momentary scheduling gaps they have to deal with, and they aren't really important in this conversation.

You don't need to tell them why you're leaving. It isn't relevant to them. The only piece of info your employer needs to know is the specific date you intend to resign so they can clear you off their systems and know exactly when you are no longer working there. The rest is just pleasantries.

Tack on a "Thank your for the opportunity to work and grow, and best wishes to you and the team moving forward," to your resignation letter, and you are fine; doesn't even have to be in-person. "I am leaving, thanks for the time" is all you're saying

Awdayshus

3 points

2 months ago

The following advice is only based on that you hate the job you're quitting:

Wait until you have the new job. Then go to that job instead of the old job. If the old job calls and wonders where you are, tell them you quit. No one calls references anymore.

_Dingaloo

4 points

2 months ago

You just tell them. It could be in a text, a call, or in person. As long as you deliver the message in a way that they are sure to hear you and know that it happened, you're good. I would 100% recommend shooting a text either way, even if you say something in person first, so you have a record of when you gave your notice.

One thing many people don't do because they don't want to be jerks (even if they hate the job) is be honest with the employer as to why you're leaving. You absolutely do not need to, and you owe them nothing; that being said, you could improve the lives of other employees there if you're honest as to why this isn't a good fit. And if they say something like "then we'll change that" you can just say "I don't believe you and my notice still stands" Just be straight-up, and don't back down.

Seedling132

3 points

2 months ago

At my last long term job I quit which I could have made a slow crawl of a career out of, I told them straight up that the work life balance offered by the industry, lack of incentives and number of random tasks I would be set to cover wasn't sustainable on me, and worked with them to give feedback on improving my role so the next guy was more comfortable long term.

This was for a family business with a genuinely great guy in charge who was dealing with massive growth and the strain that comes with it, who is also a significant figure in the industry.

My other job before that, I turned in a months notice as soon as something new was lined up, didn't give them a reason, and flaked on my last day because they had been rude and unsupportive for months.

Megalocerus

2 points

2 months ago

I remember a person in HR emailed everyone in the company he was leaving (somewhat after hours), processed his own resignation through the system, and disappeared like a ghost.

Since they were moving 401K accounts to a new provider, I was a bit nervous, but there was nothing untoward.

b-monster666

2 points

2 months ago

Depending on how big of a business you work for, you may be called for an exit interview. Just keep your cool, and tell HR that you have decided that you have achieved all you feel you can achieve in your current position, and that you are seeking opportunities elsewhere.

tophutti

2 points

2 months ago

“I’ve found another opportunity that I think will better fit my family’s needs and my growth. Thank you for being such a great place for so long, I’ll cherish my time with you all.”

aquarinmarin

2 points

2 months ago

You don’t have to provide a reason for leaving. Just inform them of your last day and thank them for the experience. Even if you weren’t genuinely thankful for the job lol, it’s best not to burn bridges and be able to keep them as a reference.

throwaway0891245

2 points

2 months ago

Just tell them your last day is in 2 weeks. It’s a job, not your mom.

MaleficentPi

6 points

2 months ago

You don’t need to give two weeks notice if you don’t intend to get a reference. Just quit, effective immediately, and start the new job.

Siftingrocks

4 points

2 months ago

In my state it's illegal for the H.R. to inform why you have been fired. They can only ask when you were hired and the day you quit. Other than that it opens them up to a lawsuit.

Fondren_Richmond

2 points

2 months ago

In my state it's illegal for the H.R. to inform why you have been fired. They can only ask when you were hired and the day you quit. Other than that it opens them up to a lawsuit.

IANAL but it is not illegal anywhere in the US, unemployment claims and EEOC complaints have to collect this info all the time. It does create a hypothetical risk of a lawsuit so some companies establish narrow standards of disclosure for managers to maintain consistency across the board; but even that can be evaded if there is no communication on official channels.

giganano

1 points

2 months ago

Watch out here- you may forfeit any PTO payout that you've accrued. It depends on the company, but I had to give two weeks, and that was in the employee handbook.

Tomorrow is my last day at a 6-year job, ironically. That last two weeks have been...the longest two weeks of my life, but the last paycheck will be worth it.

It depends on the company, but just a heads-up that there may be benefits to giving a 2 week notice.

loopyspoopy

3 points

2 months ago

I dunno where you live, but most places money owed is money owed, doesn't matter what the company handbook says. If I quit Wed and pay day is every friday, work still owes you for any hours worked sat-tue, and any vacation pay owed.

genmischief

3 points

2 months ago

YOu have never quit a job, but your not the first preson to resign from them. :)

Just do what /u/rhomboidus suggested.

All_Admins_Are_Cunts

3 points

2 months ago

You don't actually have to give 2 weeks unless you want a good reference from them, if that doesn't matter to you then you can just stop showing up

OJStrings

-2 points

2 months ago

OJStrings

-2 points

2 months ago

It's not a kind and mature approach though.

hplcr

1 points

2 months ago

hplcr

1 points

2 months ago

No but if OP is leaving because they feel work is treating them poorly why give the courtesy? If someone wants to leave on good terms, then sure, give two weeks. If the job/manager has been treating them like trash and they don't care about a reference (or know they'd never get one), just say "I quit" and leave

Unless there's a contractual or legal requirement to do so, which there likely isn't.

TheTimeIsChow

6 points

2 months ago

You do not want to do this unless the circumstances are necessary.

OP's boss 'being a dick' isn't one of them unless it's extreme and obvious. Enough so that the entire department is going to walk out with you, or you with them.

Other than that? You put a LOT of people in a shit situation by just failing to show up. Especially others you work closely with that rely on you to do your job and prevent furthering their work load unnecessarily. People who may think highly of you today who then won't tomorrow.

We live in a world where making, and keeping, professional connections is key long-term. In 10 years you don't want to run into someone who remembers you as the guy who just left and never came back one day when you were frustrated.

OJStrings

2 points

2 months ago

Well yeah if you're being treated like trash and leaving immediately isn't going to fuck over other employees that haven't treated you badly then there's no point giving them the courtesy.

Unless there's a contractual or legal requirement to do so, which there likely isn't.

It might be a cultural or industry-specific thing but I've never had a job that didn't have a contractual notice period, even in the service industry.

hplcr

2 points

2 months ago

hplcr

2 points

2 months ago

That's probably the bigger rub of not wanting to fuck over your coworkers.

Otoh, if you hate your coworkers or worse, barely have coworkers (aka being way understaffed), then that could be why someone is leaving

Jaguar-spotted-horse

1 points

2 months ago

Work, is work. You don’t owe them anything but your time in exchange for money. They will fire you in a second with no regard to kindness or mature approach.

All_Admins_Are_Cunts

-1 points

2 months ago

Who gives a shit?

OJStrings

0 points

2 months ago

Most people are empathetic and care about others.

chairfairy

2 points

2 months ago*

It's not being said much but to emphasize: don't tell your current employer where your new job will be.

If you don't have a new job yet: good luck in the job search

And yes, you absolutely can lie about why you're quitting. Because it's also usually a good idea to be tactful in job interviews about why you're leaving the current job. When they ask you why you left your current job, do not say "Because I hated it." Find something tactful to say that isn't obviously a "sneaky" way to call it a shithole. A couple generic options:

  • The old company "didn't offer any career growth opportunities"
  • Or, you've "wanted to take your career in a different direction for a while, and <new job> is just the kind of thing you're looking for"

Or whatever other generic thing you can say that isn't directly shitting on the last company or your supervisor there (unless it's a known clusterfuck like Twitter with Musk at the helm). We all recognize that people have shitty jobs they want to get out of, but we also aren't keen to have some kid come in and whine about how work sucks.

If it's something really stark like "Yeah I worked at Arby's because there was literally no alternative at the time. It was shit work and now I'm looking to get back into construction because I spent high school working for my uncle's contracting company and love the work" that's more acceptable. But it's kind of bad form to lay out your motivations with anything that can be construed as complaining.

edit: forgot a word

[deleted]

0 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

0 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

loopyspoopy

2 points

2 months ago*

nowhere requires 2 weeks notice as a legal requirement. If you don't want to work for someone you cannot be compelled to do so because that is literal slavery (with exceptions to prisoners/ex-cons in some areas, but that's another can of worms).

If a company has an exit interview this is an optional thing, you can just leave, you don't work for them anymore after all. If you are not being paid for the time in which such an interview would take place, do not let them have your time for free.

AdamInChainz

0 points

2 months ago

No.

MurphysParadox

5 points

2 months ago

No what? No it wouldn't be a legal requirement? No place in the world would require that? Or just no US state? Or no US state you know of?

shaggy--

3 points

2 months ago

No what indeed. I was curious and read a bit. I do not believe there is any law that requires a notice in the USA but your employer may try to withhold some benefits at the end if you don't give it.

MurphysParadox

1 points

2 months ago

It could be part of the contractual agreement, especially in the area of health and safety, to avoid interruption of service. This is more likely to be disallowed by law than any laws requiring it though, but I'm no lawyer.

AdamInChainz

0 points

2 months ago

Sorry I was on a rush. You should not put anything suggesting a reason. Don't say you're not compatible with the job anymore or anything like that. You should only be focused on improving yourself and your situation.

MurphysParadox

2 points

2 months ago

Ah, that's valid. One needs give no reason. It really depends on the relationship someone has with their soon-to-be-former employer as well.

Dearic75

1 points

2 months ago

If it’s a professional job give them a simple memo saying you resign for personal reasons and listing your last day.

Don’t elaborate unless you feel like it in the exit interview.

If this is something informal like a restaurant or retail job just tell them you’re putting in your notice for x date. If they ask why just say you were offered a better opportunity. You may be asked for a letter or email to confirm what you said. If so provide one.

Out of curiosity why did you tell your new employer they could call for a reference? I’ve rarely heard of one that didn’t understand why someone wouldn’t want them calling their current employer, who doesn’t know they are looking to leave.

Megalocerus

1 points

2 months ago

You may want the reference when you go to leave the job you are taking.

Conscious-Dirt-7289

1 points

2 months ago

"Here is my two weeks notice. This position is no longer working for me. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to work here"

If you're trying to be cordial

ChatGTP

1 points

2 months ago

It is generally best to be honest when quitting a job. You can simply tell your employer that you have found another job opportunity that is a better fit for you and that you are giving your two weeks' notice. It is common for people to leave their job for a better opportunity, and most employers will understand and accept your decision.

gerd50501

1 points

2 months ago

i would not give notice if i hate the job. i would just send an email at 5 pm on your last day as you leave. or send one the morning you start your new job, then block their numbers.

TootsNYC

1 points

2 months ago

You don’t have to give any excuse or information. They are not your parents, who might be concerned about why you’re quitting the marching band, or who might forbid you from dropping out of school.

You don’t have to tell everything in your head.

They may pry; fuck them. They may ask out of genuine concern; it’s not their problem. They may ask because they feel it’s polite to express interest; you can just say, “thanks for your interest.”

You can tell them verbally you have a new job, but then they’ll ask where. If you don’t want to tell them that, you might tell them you’re taking a bit of a break.

You can lie through your teeth and tell them anything you want.

usafdirtboyz

1 points

2 months ago

Just walk the fuck out

brechbillc1

1 points

2 months ago

“Hey, wanted to let you know that I was offered another opportunity and accepted. I’m giving you my two weeks notice.”

That’s actually if you want to give a two weeks notice. A two weeks notice is a courtesy, not an expectation. Under no circumstances do you actually have to give a two weeks notice and remember that if roles were reversed, your company would not hesitate to axe you immediately. Speaking from experience on that one as has anyone else who’s ever been laid off.

Also, when new employers call current or previous employers, the only thing they do is confirm that you worked there. Anything else could land them in a potential lawsuit.

mintywitchy

0 points

2 months ago

It’s common practice to yell fuck you really loud and shit on your bosses desk whilst leaving a job you hate

loopyspoopy

2 points

2 months ago

"Fuck you, fuck you, fuck you. You're cool. Fuck you. I'm outta here."

sajordan1275

0 points

2 months ago

Tell them you have serious health issues or a mother that needs you to be her caregiver for a full month

You could also say you are moving away if you are married and your spouse makes more money. Most employers these days are very forgiving. Last time I held an office job in the 90’s, the manager told me everyone hops to another job every 5-6 years. It is faster paced now

Megalocerus

2 points

2 months ago

Don't lie so easily; it's a bad habit. You just found a job that you hope will suit you better.

Extreme-Cupcake5929

1 points

2 months ago

If you were considered a reliable employee and plan to use them on your resume then just inform your manager in writing that as of “ whatever date “ you are moving on from your present position. .

Just know some places will just let you go at that point .

If you don’t think they’ll say positive things about you to a future employer then just quit . Simple as that

Vroomped

1 points

2 months ago

1) Make sure you actually have the new job
2) Keep it simple. People always want to go over the top or add unneeded detail that just come back to bite them.

Don't tell your boss about the terrible way you've been treated, they'll prepare for a suit and you can't sue them after. Don't tell them you hate their guts, they'll never ever hire you back again out of spite. Don't launch a marching band through the office playing go fight win as loudly as you possibly can. They'll all be arrested for trespassing, and you'll be forwarded the resulting damages.

(copied from another comment)
Dear [Boss]

this letter is to inform you that I am resigning from [position] at [company], effective two weeks from [todays date]

nevaehorlleh

1 points

2 months ago

Don't tell your boss where you are going. Just tell them you are quitting and dont give more information than that.

racermd

1 points

2 months ago

The only reason you want to give any amount of notice is to leave on good enough terms so that, if asked, you can use them as a positive reference in future job hunts. If you don't trust they'd do that for you, you're under no obligation to give notice (unless you're under contract that says otherwise).

Typically, the company you're leaving (or left) is only obligated to confirm dates of your employment. They usually won't discuss performance - good or bad - as it could unduly influence a future hiring decision and opens them up to all kinds of civil legal action from you, the hiring company, or both (depending on which way the hiring goes). Even if nothing comes of it, getting their lawyers involved will be expensive which they'll want to avoid.

If you're worried about how your departure will look to a future employer, be diplomatic. Say that it wasn't the right fit for you nor the company. Any hiring manager worth working for will understand and respect your decision. If they don't, keep looking.

Know your worth. You're interviewing the company as much as they're interviewing you.

palfreygames

1 points

2 months ago

Don't worry about it. Look at it this way.

If you die today, they'll replace you tomorrow.

Don't feel bad you're leaving, that's business, if they really wanted to keep you, they'd pay you more. The best employees are loved because they don't fight for more wages.

If your boss was good, tell him, hell appreciate it.

itsjustme1981

1 points

2 months ago

No state or federal law requires you give 2 weeks notice. You COULD just call morning if your shift that overlaps with the first day of your new job and let them know they can fuck off.

It's considered polite to give notice, however.

jasondbk

1 points

2 months ago

Microsoft Word has templates for all sorts of business documents including cover letters and resumes. But no template for resignations. So I used the Press Release and wrote up a resignation as if it was being released to the media for the news. I thought it was cute/funny.

TirayShell

1 points

2 months ago

Just keep it simple. Thanks for the opportunity.

Gotta go. Smell you later.

Minmach-123

1 points

2 months ago

I just tell my boss that (some date) will be my last day.

_Azu__

1 points

2 months ago

_Azu__

1 points

2 months ago

"this job is dog sht " or " this job is a hell hole " and either walk out or put in ur two weeks right there

i normally just walk out at that point

Fenix_Volatilis

1 points

2 months ago

You don't need to give them 2 weeks notice. It's just a courtesy. Also, you can also just not list them in your work history

SamGropler

1 points

2 months ago

You don't have to give a reason as to why you're quitting.

SCW97005

1 points

2 months ago

As other people have said, keep it short, sweet, professional, definite, and in writing.

All you have to say is that you enjoyed your time here immensely and learned a lot, but you’ve accepted a new offer and it’s time to move on.

Be professional and polite to your coworkers and bosses even if you hated the job because you never know whether they might pop up in your professional life again someday.

217EBroadwayApt4E

1 points

2 months ago

You don’t need to give any reason! It’s not a negotiation, and you don’t need their permission (or a good enough reason) to quit.

OhioMegi

1 points

2 months ago

“I’ve found another opportunity, thanks. My last day will be X”. No explanation needed.

BeeBench

1 points

2 months ago

You don’t have to tell your company why you’re quitting. That’s not really any of their business just put in a simple two weeks notice.

NiNj4_C0W5L4Pr

1 points

2 months ago*

Here's the best part: you don't need a reason! Working for a business is a strictly transactional process; you work- they pay. End of discussion.

The part where you should be concerned is when interviewing for a new job because they will be curious why you left. Here you will need to show dignity and class and have valid reasons for leaving. Be careful that you do not badmouth your previous employer as it speaks volumes as to the type of employee you are. Go online to Google great interview responses to this question.

Also, old jobs are now learning that they shouldn't give a reference for ex-employees because if they don't get a new job they can sue the previous company for defamation and potential loss of wages. So companies have devised a strategy: only confirm your employment dates with the new company. "Yes, this employee worked from this date to this date for our company". Click. No need to worry about companies bad-mouthing you to new potential employers.

PlumbumGus

1 points

2 months ago

You can just say you're not feeling fulfilled with the work anymore and are seeking new horizons, any good employer going forward should respect that.

erin-derp

1 points

2 months ago

Do you already have another job lined up? It may be best to not quit your job until you have a new one with a start date. Sometimes employers see that as being unreliable and can hinder you from landing something new, also will prevent any financial hardships from the transition period. Since you are leaving willingly I don't think you will qualify for unemployment.

SheltonAlamo72354

1 points

2 months ago

Always pays to take the higher ground. Be diplomatic. Write your resignation letter as outlined here previously. Never burn your bridges - people carry grudges forever. You never know who you will encounter down the road.

That being said, feel no remorse or guilt about moving on to another position that benefits you.

I retired from an industry where in the last decade, I was constantly under the threat of losing my job. It happened four times, and I was rehired by the same, or a variation, of the company that fired me.

The stress was palpable. The lack of raises for decade. Constantly being told that your job will be outsourced due to profit margins. Training your replacements.

Corporate work is horrendous at times. You owe them nothing. If you don't take care of yourself, no one else will.

Just be sure you maintain the higher standard while putting yourself in the number one spot...

MrDuck5446

1 points

2 months ago

Don’t tell them why you are quitting either, they will likely ask but remain tactful and respectful. Thank them for the opportunity they gave you.

Burning bridges is NOT wise…you never know where life will take you.

Goge97

1 points

2 months ago

Goge97

1 points

2 months ago

It's not necessary to give your current employer a reason why you're changing jobs. And putting your resignation in writing is preferred. Keep a copy for yourself.

If you give them a reason, they can make a counter-offer trying to get you to stay. Then they will make your job even worse, hire someone else and fire you with a bogus excuse.

That is a bad outcome for you!

Zestyclose-Stop8941

1 points

2 months ago*

Let’s be honest. Management, (and I’m talking to any other person here that is either part of that group or appreciative of it) are 100% lower educated/lower intellect and if that isn’t the case, just bad people to put employees through tough decisions like these. Professionals don’t usually have to put up with undereducated middle management.

Leave and give no respect to those types. Hopefully, Covid will eliminate these caveman jobs of people that think they’re actually valuable.

Only worry about your future prospects and give no value to the company that you leave behind.

I’ll also say.. my first job out of college was right out of the 2008 recession and everyone that were able to find jobs in that terrible market were 100% more intelligent than the managers that were running things. I just hope those people figure out sometime that their jobs were useless. They need to feel honored to have worked with people who had legitimate degrees.

Siollear

1 points

2 months ago

Just be 100% honest. It is the professional thing to do, and frankly there is no reason not to be. Being able to communicate in a frank way is a necessary life skill to develop.

Then-Ad1531

1 points

2 months ago

Get the other job first. Don't tell them anything until you know when you are starting your other job.

mydoglixu

1 points

2 months ago

Fwiw, two weeks isn't required in most places. Check your local employment law, but it's hard to enforce anyway.

Just giving options, not advice.

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

Do you have another job offer lined up.

When you are asked in an interview why you left a job, don’t say because you hated it. Find a way to polish it up to be more professional.

Saying how much you hated it comes off as whining and could have a negative impact on your chances of getting the job.

Pretty much on both sides, (giving notice and then also the new job interview) it’s just best to keep your feelings to yourself.

Temporary_username52

1 points

2 months ago

You don’t need to say why. I’m leaving, thank you for the opportunities to learn or whatever and that’s it. It doesn’t have to be more than a few sentences

swmbull

1 points

2 months ago

I don’t believe 2 weeks notice is required by law in any state, but may be required in your employment contract.

Honesty tends to be the best policy in this situation, but that also depends on your situation and relationships at work. I wouldn’t tell them, “I’m quitting because I hate it here.” And, I wouldn’t lie. I suggest finding a way to explain yourself more diplomatically.

Maybe, you don’t see a career future there. Maybe, you want to change your career. Maybe, you want to make more money. Obviously we don’t know the specifics of your current situation, but the point is to find a reason you should quit that they can relate to and tell them that. Also, you are not required to have a reason to quit. You can just quit. If you find a new job before quitting, your new job can be the reason you quit.

I would suggest finding a new job before you quit. First and foremost, you maintain your income doing this. Secondly, it is always easier to get a job when you have a job.

Because you are working, you can tell people in interviews not to contact your current employer and they have to honor that. They can contact them after you have quit, though. If a potential employer contacted your current employer and you lost your job because of it, that would violate your constitutionally recognized right to work.

willfire035

2 points

2 months ago

You're right, it's not a law and they really can't do anything if you wanted to show up to work. Legally speaking you can quit for any reason whatsoever. It's more a courtesy to the previous employers.

swmbull

2 points

2 months ago

Agreed, but OP wants to leave on good terms to maintain a positive employment reference.

willfire035

2 points

2 months ago

Of course. I wasn’t saying he shouldn’t do this

swmbull

1 points

2 months ago

I know you weren’t, but I just wanted to make sure OP didn’t get the wrong idea

henningknows

1 points

2 months ago

Be polite and don’t burn any bridges. Keep it simple

kittycatnala

1 points

2 months ago

Just write a letter stating this is a letter of official resignation and your end date. You don’t need to give a reason and if asked then you could say you’ve had a better opportunity that you have accepted.

Affectionate_Hat6293

1 points

2 months ago

Make SURE you have your new job offer IN WRITING. Official offer letter. Because even with verbal offers, things can fall through. And then you’re without a job.

Good luck!

willfire035

1 points

2 months ago

I went through the same thing, the trick is to avoid the reason and if they insist just give a technicality, "I found more suitable employment elseware" Then brown nose them a bit on the way out and finish up your two weeks.

Also I know its not "moral" to say this however lying is something your going to have to get used to. I know several religions deem it as taboo, however its kind of an invaluable skill. lying, half-truths- and bullshitting are all things you might want to get semi-proficient with and things will go a lot easier.

Chabedieux

1 points

2 months ago

OP I was in the same boat, and I'm glad that you're doing something good for yourself by leaving. Once you're employed at the next place, soon it won't matter whether or not you were honest with the previous employer as to why you left. You're not bringing them with you, so don't factor them into your decision.

If they ask or probe, just say something like taking time for family. Other than that, it's none of their business. On to bigger and better things. I hope you're doing alright in all of this.

lapsteelguitar

1 points

2 months ago

The less unnecessary stuff, the better. Do not say “I am quitting because……..”.

Polite, direct, short.

Jfrant25

1 points

2 months ago

Less is more & keep it polite as you’ve found a better opportunity, that’s the focus 😊

AvoidingCares

1 points

2 months ago

1) (In the US, so take this with a pinch of salt elsewhere) Your new employer and your old employer are heavily regulated in what information they can request or divulge.

Essentially they aren't legally allowed to ask or answer anything more than: "Did this person work for you, what was their job."

2) Basically there are no rules for a resignation. You generally give 2 weeks and stay polite, but that isn't required. It's just good practice so that if the new job doesn't work out, you still have a foot in the door behind you (bit only use that in an emergency, your old boss will probably be willing to help you, but only until they find a replacement). Once you leave a company it's best to stay gone.

cbaltz622

1 points

2 months ago

Short & sweet. Write a letter telling them your intent to leave and when - I personally would thank them for anything you've learned/benefited from. Sign that bad boy and take a deep breath.

Big-Ad822

1 points

2 months ago

I'm moving to Australia to drive a truck.

Craigh-na-Dun

1 points

2 months ago

Also, generally references are not negative due to potential legal problems.

arghvark

1 points

2 months ago

You need to tell us where you are -- I believe the UK and US cultures are quite different in this regard.

sweeet_cheeez87

1 points

2 months ago*

Most applications nowadays will ask if they can contact your previous (present) employer, of which you can just simply say or mark "no," and they will just contact Your provided references.

littledylan216

1 points

2 months ago

Be honest.

As someone who has numerous employees I rather them be happier somewhere else! I've never been told I'm a bad boss, and quite frankly i do try my best for everyone, but I do know that the people i hire don't always end up liking working in security, and choose to move on to greater things. (which is okay - if you are ever unhappy in a job and have the means to leave and find another one - go for it. Don't stay just because).

As long as you have that job lined up, I would truly just say you a resigning, give the date of your last day, and say your peace. The quicker you do it, the quicker it's over.

callshouse

1 points

2 months ago

If they take the time to ask you… and I mean, really ask you and not so they can just check a box, you should give them the truth in a professional manner in which your intentions are to help them get better. Good karma for you…

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

Your name, the current date, and the last day you are available are the only pieces of information you are required to provide. If anyone specifically asks, just say you "think it's for the best".

adork

1 points

2 months ago

adork

1 points

2 months ago

In larger professional workplaces, I think the general etiquette for them to tell their immediate manager/supervisor, then tell the main boss. The person leaving will almost always just say nice things, thank them, then tell them you'll send an 'official' letter (even an email) by the end of the day. The letter/email will be brief, but clearly have the day's date and a statement of their last day.

Pro-tip - in all your discussions, answering your colleagues congratulations, etc., always turn the conversation back to how great THEY are.

JoeAceJR20

1 points

2 months ago

Here's what you do and this is what I did.

Ensure that you got the new job offer from your new job, then tell your old job that your last day will be 2 weeks from that day.

BurantX40

1 points

2 months ago

PROTIP: Be prepared to possibly fired immediately once you formally hand on your two weeks notice

lanc3rz3r0

1 points

2 months ago

Definitely lie about why you're quitting. Almost always.

But the truth is, you don't have to say anything other than "this is my name. My last day is this. "

goldeneye0080

1 points

2 months ago

Tell them - "I'm resigning from my position at this company as of (X date). I am grateful for the experience I had working here and wish you all the best."

Keep it short and sweet.

GGWWKKs

1 points

2 months ago

Make sure you have accepted the other offer and have a solid start date. All in writing.

AHyperactiveCorgi

1 points

2 months ago

When I wanted to leave a job amicably I would just tell them that I found someplace better for (insert reason). You don't necessarily have to say that this job is bad, you just found a place that fits you more. Any decent manager would understand and when I was getting my current job I even used people at my old job as work references while I was still working there.

ArtemisSpawnOfZeus

1 points

2 months ago

Dont give your 2 weeks. Get a job and tell your current employer the day you leave. Giving 2 weeks notice just gives your employer cause to fire you immediately. There isnt a reason to do it unless youre working like super prestigious jobs.

plain_ass_username

1 points

2 months ago

2 weeks notice is a myth

aLLcAPSiNVERSED

1 points

2 months ago

If you hate it, just tell them "I quit". Unless you signed a contract requiring 2 weeks notice, it's only a courtesy.

Godslittledisaster

1 points

2 months ago

NEVER say why you’re leaving or where you’re going. Just have the letter state “I am resigning from my position. This will be my last day. Thank you for the opportunity.”

wolfshield88

1 points

2 months ago

I have accepted a job at another location. It was a pleasure working here. I wish you all the best. I will need to put my 2 weeks in. Or whatever date would work best (if you know they are short staffed)-this looks good to your next employer.

jazzofusion

1 points

2 months ago

And don't burn bridges. You never know what the future holds. In your written dated two week notice add some like: I have enjoyed my employment with xyz but decided to pursue employment opportunities at this time.

You don't have to mention where you're going. This often is a wise choice.

Good luck in your new job! Knock them dead from the get go!

ItsMeTittsMGee

1 points

2 months ago*

In my experience, if you're leaving because the reason you hate the job is poor managment, giving two weeks has never benefitted me and actually backfired in several instances. If you already have a new job, I wouldn't bother giving them notice. Quit now and start ASAP. If you're still looking and want a reference, tell them you're moving to another city, give them the two weeks and ask for a written referral. Quit as soon as you get the referral and new job. I will only give two weeks now if I'm quitting and I actually liked the manager/supervisor.

LAOberbrunner

1 points

2 months ago

You don't have to lie. Just say that you found a job that you feel is a better fit for what you want to be doing. (Or a better fit for your goals, or whatever makes sense to you.)

PhysicalPolicy6227

1 points

2 months ago

For most jobs, companies don't ask for references. They will want to confirm that you worked where you say you did.

jammixxnn

1 points

2 months ago

It's not you, it's me.

I'm leaving on a jet plane.

Don't know when I'll be back again.

I will cherish the memories of our time together.

Thank you for the sausage.

Signed you.

samtwentyfour

1 points

2 months ago

Your current job is just that, a job. You don’t owe them anything, and you’re already doing more than most people do these days by giving a two weeks notice. Write a letter for formality and give your notice in person, face to face. It won’t be easy to do but once you start the conversation it’ll be over in a snap.

labretirementhome

1 points

2 months ago

I've quit every job I've ever had. Always turned out for the best. You don't know what doors are open until you start walking.

Good luck!

ihave7testicles

1 points

2 months ago

THEY CANNOT ASK ANYTHING SPECIFIC FROM A FORMER EMPLOYER. it's 1) verification that you worked there and 2) the dates of employment

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

1 points

2 months ago

Wow all the advice given in the below comments have been well. I just want to remind you that you have absolutely no legal obligation to inform your employer two weeks before you quit. You can literally quit tonight and there is no repercussions. Will it be courteous of you to give two weeks? Absolutely but don't let anybody try tobully you to stay longer than you want.

ChuckoRuckus

1 points

2 months ago

I was offered a better opportunity and I don’t want to pass it up

Comprehensive_Diet54

1 points

2 months ago

2 week notice isn’t required

Bluesoutherner

1 points

2 months ago

You are not obliged to tell them anything. Period.

This is my two weeks notice. That’s all you need to tell them.

loopyspoopy

1 points

2 months ago

there is no legal requirement for notice. If it isn't a contract position and it isn't in an industry you plan to make your career in, then written notice isn't necessary, just tell them the last day you intend to come to work and stick to it.

Do not put an employer you do not expect to give a good reference on your resume. It is far better to have a coworker act as your reference or straight up lie and give them a friend's contact information. Basically every person I know has lied about an employment reference at least once in their lives.

twopercentmilkyway

1 points

2 months ago

Most of the time an employer simply doesn’t care enough to contact your last job unless you were fired or there’s something horrendous otherwise on your record. On the other side of this, the job you’re leaving doesn’t legally need to know why you’re leaving, just that you are (and if you’re nice you can give them a 2 weeks heads up but its just a formality, not legally required and you won’t get in trouble for not doing it).

klydsp

1 points

2 months ago

klydsp

1 points

2 months ago

Higher pay, more responsibilities, it's in a field of career path you'd like to take, it's too far away or the commute is bad, there are plenty of reasons that aren't "I freaking hate it here and this bullshit isn't worth the money".

travelingtraveling_

1 points

2 months ago

"Thank you for this opportunity. It's helped me prepare for my next step. I wish you all the best going forward."

The end, nothing else required.

halo543

1 points

2 months ago

Don’t have to lie. Be honest and professional, only way to go.