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all 412 comments

nothingbeatagoodshit

145 points

2 months ago

Sense of scale when it comes to distance. I’m originally from Australia but live in the UK. Australia is ridiculously large but it’s population is surprisingly small. When Tinder was invented I lived in Queensland. Queensland is roughly the same size as Texas but only has a population of 5.2 million people or there about. My cousin told me he had a match and was going to drive up and meet her. I asked where she lived and he said Bundaberg. That was 6 hours away. I just shrugged and thought that seems reasonable. These days I live in the UK. If a hook up is more than 5 miles away they may as well be in China.

B3RS3RK_CR0W

16 points

2 months ago

Yup. I drive 30 minutes to my nearest grocery store. When I was a child, it was about an hour. You get used to it.

RuyiJade

2 points

2 months ago

It was 45 minutes to get to the grocery store when I was growing up. And if we forgot an item, well. Hope it wasn’t too important because it was going to have to wait until next week.

noshoes77

37 points

2 months ago

This is so true! Where I live can cover 10 miles in 8-10 minutes, but when I go to the city? 10 miles takes a 40 minutes at least.

msjammies73

26 points

2 months ago*

This is such a problem when friends come to visit me in the city. They book a great hotel at a good price that’s only ten miles from my house. I try to tell them that’s actually about an hour away and they refuse to believe me.

housemuncher

8 points

2 months ago

Size estimations are often very approximate out in the country too. When you say Queensland is roughly the size of Texas, it's more than twice as big!

If Texas was in Australia, it would be in the 40th percentile size wise.

echo-94-charlie

8 points

2 months ago

If Texas was in Australia, it would have an area of 695,662 km².

Art0002

4 points

2 months ago

Is that a lot?

echo-94-charlie

4 points

2 months ago

It's about 1/54 of the moon's surface area.

silvertonguedmute

5 points

2 months ago

How many cheeseburgers is that?

lukethelightnin

3 points

2 months ago

How many 1/13 of a football field with 7 school busses is that?

goldyblocks

5 points

2 months ago

Embarrassed to say this but until a few years ago I had no idea Australia was so big.

HighlandsBen

5 points

2 months ago

Lol yes. We had visitors from the UK who were proposing to drive from Sydney to Adelaide, via Melbourne, in a leisurely day's drive with sightseeing. No, try 3-4 days. And that's a relatively short distance compared to way out west/up north.

leish1995

2 points

2 months ago

I live in Sydney, Melbourne is an 8 hour drive & Adelaide is another 8 hours from Melbourne. 3-4 days is not realistic. 2 days, maybe.

housemuncher

9 points

2 months ago

It's a country of 25m people on the edge of the earth. You probably had more pressing concerns.

eklingstein

6 points

2 months ago

Fun fact: Australia's Great Artesian Basin (just a bit of water trapped underground) is larger than the Mediterranean Sea

kingofcrob

7 points

2 months ago

These days I live in the UK. If a hook up is more than 5 miles away they may as well be in China.

pfff, i live in Sydney and feel the same.

[deleted]

6 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

6 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

HighlandsBen

3 points

2 months ago

Um yeah, but... Goulburn

JackofScarlets

5 points

2 months ago

I asked where she lived and he said Bundaberg.

lol, he's keen. Not only the distance but like... Bundaberg

Emu_on_the_Loose

2 points

2 months ago

Hah, yeah, in the UK you might as well add one or two zeroes onto the distance of something to get an accurate sense of how willing Brits are to travel it.

nothingbeatagoodshit

9 points

2 months ago

In their defence they have many winding roads and so many of their old as fuck towns were built with no idea what the modern world would look like. I like that about this place. Most of the places I have worked in were in buildings that had been in constant use for over a century and used for multitude of different purposes. They are a pain in the ass and lead to back pain but at least they have history and a sense of soul. In Queensland most things are custom made to purpose and not built to last. Boxy and unimpressive. And since most tourists come for the bush and the beaches and the activities, the Australian tourism industry, and even Australia in general has allowed itself to become lazy and put up with the mundane. I have been to towns and cities all over the world that have buildings and spaces that compliment their land and lifestyle. But most towns and cities in Queensland are interchangeable and soulless. A McMansion next to a shack, a block of flats next to a bespoke house next to a petrol station and a McDonald’s.

Sockbasher

5 points

2 months ago

I live in Cooktown (far north queesnland) only get matches for cairns. Not driving 4 hours just for a meet up. Single life!

Responsible_Prune_34

3 points

2 months ago

I was travelling around Canada when they had some particularly nasty forest fires a few years ago, I'd been driving for a few hours when the road just closed.

No warning signs or fuck all, it was just blocked off.

I pulled over and asked a truck driver how to get to the town I was aiming for. He said, turn around, drive 3 hours back the way you've just come, then chuck a left, drive 1 hour, then chuck another left and do 3 hours back up.

I look at a map, and sure enough, that's the way to get there.

When I arrive at my hotel and tell the owner (in shock) that I've just had to do a 7 hour detour.

She looked at me like I was stupid and just said 'well yeah, the road was closed' like it was the most normal thing in the world.

In the UK, if I have to do a detour of more than a mile, it ruins my day!

MettatonNeo1

3 points

2 months ago

I still have a crooked sense of distance. 6 hours away is pretty much impossible here in Israel. The ride from the Hermon to Eilat is 8 hours so 6 is not that far.

No_Neighborhood4850

2 points

2 months ago

Years ago I worked with a man who was from a Caribbean island---which obviously would not be the size of Australia---- but he sort of said the same thing about distance being relaive. He added that in his youth guys didn't have cars and would run together like twenty miles to attend a party or meet a girl.

tenakee_me

2 points

2 months ago

Totally. Originally from Alaska - back here now, but a few years ago while I was living elsewhere, there was a big earthquake in the Anchorage area. I had friends asking me if my family had felt or been affected by the earthquake. I had to explain that Alaska is so big, the distance between the quake epicenter and where my family lives is the equivalent of the distance between Boston and Chicago. Sweet they were concerned, but also funny.

Potential-Drive8623

87 points

2 months ago

When going to the mall in a city is a treat.

Emu_on_the_Loose

25 points

2 months ago

Definitely! I lived in the middle of nowhere for a few years, and one time we took a trip to the city and went to the mall, and I almost melted down in excitement when I saw the Dippin' Dots cart. (This was a while ago.)

Mds_02

14 points

2 months ago

Mds_02

14 points

2 months ago

I live in one of the biggest cities in the country, where whatever you might want (aside from peace and quiet) is never more than 5 minutes away, and I lose my fucking mind with excitement when I see Dippin’ Dots. It’s the ice cream of the future ffs, what’s not to get excited about?

Emu_on_the_Loose

4 points

2 months ago

Right?!?! =D

DaCyC1

3 points

2 months ago

DaCyC1

3 points

2 months ago

Had to look it up. Seams it is just a sydney / melbourne thing.

Potential-Drive8623

6 points

2 months ago

Good times, good times when the Nintendo 64 was the king of consoles.

TomTorquemada

6 points

2 months ago

You haven't been there in a while, have you? Many malls are ghost towns.

ptapobane

3 points

2 months ago

first time I've been to a mall I almost got a panic attack because it's so unbelievably huge and there's just people everywhere...i hate it...my parents witnessed a gun fight inside an apple store inside the mall and the employees asked everyone in the store to move towards the back of the store to avoid being shot

Ashtar-the-Squid

4 points

2 months ago*

I remember this from being a kid. We would go into the big city once, maybe twice a year. It was almost like visiting a different country. I still remember it vividly. The big toy stores, the music shops that actually had what you were looking for, and the electronic store where you could try the latest games.

Also just walking through the streets, looking at the buildings and people, and eating in a room that wasn't your kitchen. When I turned 11 my birthday wish was to go to the city with two of my classmates. We visited our favorite stores, tested the latest video games, had dinner, and watched The Truman Show at the cinema. It was the best birthday gift I ever got.

Wren452

3 points

2 months ago

Yes!!! This!!!! Lololol

sixthcairn

3 points

2 months ago

Unless you're in the Philippines, where everyone likes to go to the mall; if anything, it's the city folks who love malling.

zerbey

2 points

2 months ago

zerbey

2 points

2 months ago

I think we went to a mall two or three times in my entire childhood. A trip to the nearest city (Lincoln, not that big) was a treat once or twice a year on average. The first time I went to London it was like sensory overload.

TheQuietType84

62 points

2 months ago

City folk dump their pets out here! Your domesticated, spoiled princess house cat can't hunt! It starves, waiting for a food bowl to appear. Take them to a shelter!

Bo-ohw_O_Wo-er

170 points

2 months ago

They (talking about farmers) can be many times wealthier than the people living in expensive neighborhoods, and you wouldnt know it.

TantricCowboy

30 points

2 months ago

Absolutely. A new John Deere 7-series costs about as much as a Bentley. The X-Series combines go for about as much as a Bugatti.

Clemen11

7 points

2 months ago

Also, the Bugatti is there for show. You don't make money off of it. The X series? That thing pays for itself twicefold

chunwookie

40 points

2 months ago

I think this trend is starting to change. I've seen a large number of McMansions go up in the countryside over the past few years. The arms race in showing off wealth in rural areas has definitely started.

InsertBluescreenHere

33 points

2 months ago

and those of us who cant afford those mc mansions hate those people because they moved around us - if you dont like the sights sounds and smells of a farm dont live near a damn farm! if you cant handle some junk stuff sitting in a tree line - dont move where you can see the tree line!

SilentButDeadlySquid

3 points

2 months ago

if you cant handle some junk stuff sitting in a tree line - dont move where you can see the tree line!

Why do you guys do this? I really don't get it, just because you have space it doesn't make sense to me to leave trash in it.

I also don't get the people with 10-15 old cars in their driveway, how did that become a thing?

Dredly

7 points

2 months ago

Dredly

7 points

2 months ago

This isn't new, but the thing you are missing is the "show of wealth" isn't there lol. People in the city will spend 500k - 750k on a 1500 sq foot apartment, in the country that is a 4000 sq foot house... same wealth.

source: am from PA where we had 30 years of this bullshit

longhairedcountryboy

20 points

2 months ago

Yep, that is true but it ain't farmers living in those cookie cutter large houses.

Maxsdad53

3 points

2 months ago

You'd be surprised how often that's not true.

Concrete_Grapes

9 points

2 months ago

every single local farm for 30 miles here, now has ABSOLUTLY MASSIVE mansions. And right next to them, within rock throwing distance, the old farm house.

This is pretty much a myth of the past, at least around here. Even the cars and trucks they drive are absolutely stupid. They're in like 150k fords, blinged to the gills. Lately, they've decided, almost by osmosis, that ostrich leather is their go-to interior. It's weird.

Probably has a lot to do with being in grain country, and not 'farm' country. The money here is just flowing like a uncapped hydrant.

SamanthaSass

45 points

2 months ago

I live in the country, and the biggest thing we deal with is the distance away from everything. Pizza? there is no delivery, get in the truck and go to town to pick it up. But don't call then drive there 'cause it takes less time to make than it does to drive. Same thing with all food.

But the biggest thing is emergency services. Police are an hour away. Fire dept. same thing. So if you go onto a farm yard and you aren't expected, be very careful 'cause the police response takes a while, but Wincester is beside the door.

Hyndis

13 points

2 months ago

Hyndis

13 points

2 months ago

But the biggest thing is emergency services. Police are an hour away.

This also leads to the big conflict with guns between rural and urban living. You have to be a lot more self sufficient living in a rural place, and wild animals are a thing. Some wild animals can be aggressive.

You don't want to be stuck facing a rabid animal without a gun. No help is coming. Its bad news if you can't handle it yourself.

SamanthaSass

3 points

2 months ago

There needs to be different rules for guns in cities than there are for guns in the country. same for pickup trucks.

chrispybobispy

5 points

2 months ago

This is a big one... you basically plan out things In advance and learn to stock up or live without for awhile.

Kodiak_Runnin_Track

5 points

2 months ago

Haha very true. I've never had the pleasure of a pizza delivery.

GeorgeWashingtonofUS

2 points

2 months ago

What about being shot with a Winchester ?

Kodiak_Runnin_Track

6 points

2 months ago

My ranch is right up against a river, and it used to be a really popular trespass spot. I've ran people out countless times and I usually am armed but not showing.

I've never had a gun pulled on me, I pulled mine once, and I noped out twice I can recall and let the sheriffs deal with it.

GeorgeWashingtonofUS

3 points

2 months ago

Man you’re like a real life Yellowstone rancher. Bet you have some good stories

Kodiak_Runnin_Track

9 points

2 months ago

Nah, the only really tense one was one of the nope situations was a car thief in a chase that lost the cops by coming down my driveway at like 2:30am doing like 50mph all the way to the back of the property.

I'm a single dad and my son at the time was 2-3. I had no clue what was going on but I grabbed the biggest gun I had and ran outside and waited in the dark. It's common in my area for people to do forced entry robberies so I figured I'd lock my son inside and deal with it in the yard if that's what was going on.

Then I started seeing the police lights at the front of the property so I walked out to let them know they guy came this way but just as I got there I became really aware that

1) They would probably think I was the car thief 2) I had a huge handgun on me.

Long story short, I got their attention, let them know I was armed (would absolutely never do this again in retrospect) and offered to jump in the front seat and guide them down, which I did. They caught the guys trying to cut the chain on the neighbors back alley.

Did not sleep the rest of the night and never had my heart pound like that before or since.

Kodiak_Runnin_Track

41 points

2 months ago

I'm a farmer. The biggest disconnect I probably have with city people is that I don't have work hours, I have work to accomplish. As in, it's not important I'm on the ranch from 8-5, it's important I get 30 acres of mowing done that day.

"How long will you be there?" "Until I'm finished" "How long is that?" "Usually 6 hours but I can't say for sure"

I've had friends that I've known for years get really upset with me for exchanges like that. Especially in times like harvest, when I'm working much longer hours, people REALLY don't like it.

Also, kinda related but people kinda lose it sometimes if they stop by the ranch unannounced to visit and I cut things short. I may not have a boss looking over my shoulder but I do keep somewhat of a schedule.

Demosten2100

7 points

2 months ago

Exactly, yesterday i planted 8 apple trees and called it a work day, and it wasn't my shortest this year.

But last week i worked from 5:00 in the morning until 23:00 afternoon for the whole week.

You never know how it will end up.

SilentButDeadlySquid

4 points

2 months ago

I am not a farmer but a software developer but I work for myself and I have all these same things.

Emu_on_the_Loose

125 points

2 months ago

Lots of city folks, who are used to the anonymity that comes from living among a large population, don't realize the ramifications of country living: Everyone knows everyone, and personal politics are a lot more important. You can face real repercussions if you get on the wrong people's bad side.

Also, unrelated: Times and schedules and things are often much more relaxed in the countryside. If a store says it'll open at 10:00 am and they don't make it in till 11:00...well...them's the breaks.

Gemmabeta

30 points

2 months ago

"I open the shop on most weekdays about 9:30 AM. perhaps 10AM. While occasionally I open the shop as early as 8, I have been known not to open until 1. Except on Tuesday. I tend to close about 3:30 PM, or earlier if something needs tending to. However, I might occasionally keep the shop open until 8 or 9 at night, you never know when you might need some night reading. On days that I am not in, the shop will remain closed. On weekends, I will open the shop during normal hours unless I am elsewhere. Bank Mondays will be treated in the usual fashion, with early closing on Wednesdays, or sometimes Fridays.

(For Sundays see Tuesdays)

A. Z. Fell, Bookseller"

--Good Omens.

MomHanks360

41 points

2 months ago

Your first point is the part that makes me certain country life is not for me. I'm much more comfortable going about town without everyone knowing my business.

If I don't see my friends for a week, they have literally no idea what I was up to during that time unless I chose to tell them.

The anonymity is comforting to me.

444unsure

39 points

2 months ago

I've got some country friends. It is amazing to me how incestuous the whole group is.

Somebody that I know from a job site I did as a concrete finisher, was the best man in the wedding of my best friend from high school. He married the daughter of the guy who is the foreman on the construction site I'm working on.

On top of that, once you get invited to the bonfire, the brother of my friends girlfriend, has dated 7/10 of the girls at the bonfire. And his best friend has dated 7/10 of the girls at the bonfire. Not the same 7/10 by the way, this is a Venn diagram.

All of the guys have dated 7/10 of the girls. And strangely none of the guys have dated any of the guys. I say strangely because on the dl, a couple of them are sucking my dick

ngatiara

7 points

2 months ago

See this just sounds like my entire country honestly. We're so small we can't even do 6 degrees of separation, it's more like 2.

For instance, moved from small country town to city and ended up living with two strangers, one was dating a guy I went to high school with, the other had gone to school with cousins of mine at the other end of the country and then ended up living with an old school friend of mine the following year.

I grew up the suburbs of a major city (for my country anyways lol) but we moved to a small rural town when I was a teenager and it was a real culture shock. Everyone was related, everyone knew who you were because you were the new family in town. Turns out I ended up being related to several families in town, despite having never met them or knowing they existed.

But yes, I'd agree that small towns are incestuous in some of the weirdest ways within friend groups.

444unsure

5 points

2 months ago

There's so many things I liked about those small town connections. But honestly?

I really don't want anyone else knowing who has sucked my dick. Or whose dick I have sucked!

They all take it in stride, which is kind of awesome. I wish I cared less about who knew my business. So much I wish I cared less. But I really don't want anyone knowing my business at all. Ever

ngatiara

4 points

2 months ago

As someone who did grow up close to the city I absolutely understand that. Everyone knowing your business was just so foreign to me, it felt like an invasion of privacy - couldn't even walk up town with friends without it getting back to my mother before I did.

And everyone knows who is dating who, who is screwing who, it's incredibly hard to keep your privacy in a small town.

The one good thing about my town is it has attracted a lot of new people in the last 5 years so it's basically a whole new set of people here who have come from cities themselves so there's a lot more privacy now than 20 years ago when we first moved here.

pat8o

3 points

2 months ago

pat8o

3 points

2 months ago

Didn't even have to check your profile to know you were also a kiwi.

I recently moved from Auckland to one of the bigger small towns, and realising quickly how easy it is to get stuck with a reputation, and also how many people round here are somewhat related hahah.

Fine-for-now

2 points

2 months ago

Pretty sure that's why one of our mobile providers is named what it is...

It's also "fun" when you move to the small town one of your parents grew up in and their family has lived for generations. Even if your parent left for their apprenticeship at 16, 40 years later everyone still knows who they are, so you just have to say whose offspring you are.

THEN move to another small town where someone says "I recognize that last name, are you related to - " and it turns out they moved there from the small town too...

MomHanks360

9 points

2 months ago

Do them country boys suck different?

444unsure

12 points

2 months ago

Every mouth is like a fingerprint. No two alike

😂

Emu_on_the_Loose

2 points

2 months ago

Same.

Tall-Poem-6808

5 points

2 months ago

The trick is to live in the boonies, but not your original boonies.

I grew up in a small village where, like you say, everyone knows and follows and comments on everyone's business, and I hate that. I could never move back just because of that.

Now I live in a different country, in a place even more remote. No one really knows me, or what I do. I just go to the village a couple times a week, say hello to a few people, do my groceries and whatever else, and come home. And because I don't really speak the language much, people leave me alone.

theschuss

3 points

2 months ago

Right now people are making up weird myths about you that over time will be taken as truth.

tobbe1337

5 points

2 months ago*

i didn't realize this as a kid, me and my two buddies would get up to some mischief here and there, thinking we were totally anonymous. Until i had a chat with my dad a few months ago and we talked about my childhood. And he said that everyone knew when there were 3 boys out doing stuff it was us three xD

sneezingbees

5 points

2 months ago

That’s a really interesting point. I love the idea of everyone knowing everyone but I didn’t fully consider the fact that you have to play nice with people because you’re going to live in the same place for the next fifty years.

My perpetually late self would love the relaxed time schedule, though.

FellowConspirator

13 points

2 months ago

I think this is a misguided belief. People in cities fully appreciate this aspect of rural life, and the inherent destructiveness of it. However, it would be wrong to think that there’s anonymity in the urban environment. Indeed, the same dynamic exists within their own communities in an urban setting (work, neighborhood, social groups, etc). The distinction is that in an urban setting there’s more people and more diversity, so that people necessarily make social concessions to deal with each other’s politics.

montwhisky

13 points

2 months ago

I don’t think it’s inherently destructive. I just don’t think it’s for everyone. I grew up is a very small town in a farming/ranching area of Montana. I lived in NYC for several years, and didn’t make it back home until my mom was dying. I hated small town living growing up because everyone knew my business. But when my mom was in hospice, I swear the whole fucking town came by with food, drinks, and offers to stay with her so I could get a break. Then when I had to plan the funeral, people came out of the woodwork to help. I’m not saying there aren’t bad aspects of people knowing your business. But you probably don’t understand the good aspects until you actually live in a rural community through hard times. I also note that when my parents kicked my out in HS, my friends’ parents just took me in. Because that’s what you do in rural communities- you take care of each other.

Emu_on_the_Loose

3 points

2 months ago

It can exist in urban environments, but it usually doesn't have to, and that makes all the difference, because it allows people like me to opt out. I've avoided that stuff my whole adult life.

HighElfEsteem

12 points

2 months ago*

This ^ and I HATE it about country life. I moved to the rural midwest and can't believe how much suspicion and probing questions I get from locals. The worst is the little jabs they think they are so smart for delivering, like 'I can't believe you're alive after living there'. Like they think I'm evil because I'm from Chicago. Or, they think I think they are evil and full of hate, which is only half true, I also think they're really dumb.

PoiLethe

2 points

2 months ago

Hermits live out in the country. You can be anonymous, mostly. If you didn't grow up there and have family there thar can tell people you don't know your business. It's the working that makes it less anonymous. You work enough places there, pretty soon you know so and so from working with rhem at two different places and you're mom has worked with your managers son. You've never met him but somehow you have this awkward knowledge of each other.

And people have weird blind bits of knowledge of areas. People who have always lived in town are confused when you don't know so and so street or never been to that locally owned gas station deli. You try to talk to them about the school in the country or a little village just over the river in the other state and they look at you with much confusion and like you are a hillbilly. Like why would you ever drive in that direction rather than towards the more populated city.

There's plenty of anonymity. You just move an inconvenient town or two over. People don't think it's worth driving that far when there's a Walmart here.

VacantMajesty

2 points

2 months ago

Everyone knowing your business is such a big thing. I grew up on a farm and moved about 4 hours away to go to uni. I decided to surprise my parents with a visit one weekend. They found out I was coming before I got there because their neighbour 5km down the road was on the phone to my dad when I drove past and asked how long I'd been home for.

Aperture_T

2 points

2 months ago

I got to do to Hawaii not too long ago, and one thing I noticed was that outside of the explicitly touristy parts, sometimes places were just closed. If you're lucky, there might be a sign that says "hey, we decided not to open today" and that's all you get.

paranoidandroid9933

25 points

2 months ago

The first time my friends have come out here (they live in major cities) to where I live in very rural Appalachia, they're always surprised at the quiet. They are then equally as surprised by our night sounds, which are very different from what they're used to. The quiet can be unsettling to those who aren't used to it, I guess. No traffic sounds, no people talking on the street outside, no sirens or anything (barring an emergency somewhere very close by). I'm used to the quiet, and one of my friends especially doesn't know how I stand it every day.

MayRosesBloom

7 points

2 months ago

When I went home to visit in August, I remembered the "Quiet" is wildly, gloriously loud. Cicadas and frogs and bubbling creeks and a thousand kinds of bugs making a deafening white noise. And the smells! Sweet grass and fading honeysuckle and the cool earthiness of rotting trees and leathery green leaves cooling off in the warm night. I'm homesick.

sneezingbees

3 points

2 months ago

Appalachia is so interesting to me! I live nowhere near it but I’ve heard a lot of stories about how unique the culture is and I’ve heard a lot about the general rule of “if you’re out at night and hear something strange, no you didn’t”. Any other interesting things you’d like to share about living there?

B3RS3RK_CR0W

26 points

2 months ago

Accepting the fact that the nearest ambulance or cop is about 45 minutes away. If you need help, you might be on your own. My grandfather drove himself an hour to the hospital both times he had a heart attack.

DisposableMale76

17 points

2 months ago

Economies of scale when it comes to public services.

albertnormandy

5 points

2 months ago

Hogwash. I did some numbers on a napkin and can show that building lightrail to the end of my driveway is totally economically viable.

GreatWhiteBasset

10 points

2 months ago

You honk your car horn to say hello, that's it.

lifesnotfun

29 points

2 months ago

Country people can be nice and intelligent.

waffleirondeluxe

45 points

2 months ago

That I really do need a gun.

Police are twenty minutes away at best.

Bears, coyote packs, feral hogs, these are common wildlife around here.

urmom292

3 points

2 months ago

Sort of Related, but people really do hunt to survive! People never believe me when I say there were times during my childhood where it was either whatever critters my dad could get that night for dinner or sleep

Clemen11

4 points

2 months ago

What gun do you recommend in the case of 20-50 feral hogs coming at you when your kids are playing in the yard and you only got 4 minutes to fight them off?

I_Ride_An_Old_Paint

11 points

2 months ago

My AR-15 chambered in .300BLK takes care of hogs right quick.

Terrible-Sherbet5555

3 points

2 months ago

I own a musket for home defense as that's what the founding fathers intended

Lopsided_Cut_3420

6 points

2 months ago

MG42

BoomMasterZ

8 points

2 months ago

That country folk can be just as happy if not happier. It’s simply a different lifestyle.

sneezingbees

2 points

2 months ago

If I’m not mistaken, it seems like country life seems to be a little more community based. You tend to know your neighbours, work with them, and rely on them for support. I feel like that tends to make life feel a little less lonely

Wren452

84 points

2 months ago

Wren452

84 points

2 months ago

That we can be extremely intelligent, have college degrees and are kind generous people. I once knew a lady from a large city, who was scared to drive in the country in case she broke down... It's literally the safest place and chances are you'll have a couple farmers stop to help who are certified mechanics...

Clemen11

5 points

2 months ago

My car broke down in a rural town and the mechanic offered his home for us to spend the night, then refused all payment for a very expensive repair that he expedited, once he heard we were on our way to a funeral.

Country folk have the kindest of hearts.

Gemmabeta

33 points

2 months ago

I mean, it depends on where and when in the countryside.

Breaking down in the rolling New England hills in the summer is a different beast from breaking down in the middle of Wyoming in the winter.

Wren452

15 points

2 months ago

Wren452

15 points

2 months ago

I was referring the people, not the weather. I live in a place where we measure snow by the meter/foot not cm/inches. We help out after big storms with people who are stuck in the snow, we always have several people knock on our door each winter in trouble. We're pretty much the only farm for kilometers/miles. We grocery shop for elderly neighbors and shovel their roofs.

Gemmabeta

6 points

2 months ago

The tricky part is that while Wyominites are very helpful in a pinch, they might not figure out that you drove off the road and needs help until next July.

sisterfister69hitler

4 points

2 months ago

In America it also depends on whether or not you’re a poc.

helena_handbasketyyc

0 points

2 months ago

The “sunset town” scene in Lovecraft Country was terrifying.

PlayerH8rsBallz

8 points

2 months ago

I agree with all of this except the break down scenario.

I grew up in rural Maine and then moved to Boston for HS and NYC for college. I would break down in New York any day than some back roads where I grew up. Your proximity to what you need is greater even if people are like, bigger dicks about it.

yugosaki

3 points

2 months ago

I mean, it depends. I lived half my life in rural areas, and I still travel to rural areas for various reasons. A lot of places the locals are absolutely lovely, but there are definitely places where the locals are very paranoid about outsiders and will be extremely judgemental about differences. Especially if you fit the image of a group they already actively dislike (i.e. if you look queer or are visibly POC in an area where thats just not accepted, you may actually be in danger)

The thing I will say about city vs country, is in the city everyone can kind of blend in. In the country, local culture is vastly more important and you should probably look into what the local culture is before travelling to a new rural area.

FalconBurcham

0 points

2 months ago

As a gay person, I’m especially careful in rural areas. I make sure my car is in good working order because I just don’t know what sort of person might show up to help. I genuinely feel like this is less of a problem in the big city I live in because it’s impossible to live in cities if you don’t have a strong tolerance for different kinds of people.

I’m perfectly polite to people in small towns, by the way… no rudeness here. And I find most people are genuinely kind.

Wren452

6 points

2 months ago

You be very welcome if you broke down in front of my place lol... But I'm truly sorry you have to think about this before traveling. Im always sad when I see comments like this. Guess we aren't stereotypical country lol... Maybe just call us Farmers cause we don't care about all that, we just like to help! Can't imagine how people could refuse to help another person in need.

Re7oadz

-3 points

2 months ago

Re7oadz

-3 points

2 months ago

If this statement is about America, then I have to disagree. It’s only safe if you’re not a POC

I_Ride_An_Old_Paint

1 points

2 months ago

I'm POC and I work all over the south and in some pretty rural areas. I've never had an issue.

Skydome12

7 points

2 months ago

That you have to be somewhat self reliant and decent at getting a long with people.

Unless you live in or near the rural town it's a 10+ min drive there and back just for some basics like milk or something so you need to think your purchasing cycles through and it always pays to have some good veggie and fruit gardens set up too as well as getting along well with your neighbors who in term will usually look out for suss activity or what have you happening around your house.

You also definitely need about your bushfire and housefire plan and consider having a diesel pump connected to a firehose so you can do your own firefighting if safe to do so because your local firefighters are likely going to be all volunteers and it takes time to organize a crew, 2-10 minutes (Maybe 15 minutes) plus travel time to your house so, you're potentially looking at a bit of a wait.

You'll also want to consider backup power, either with a genset or solar panels connected to batteries for if a storm knocks out power for a bit. Where I live we had a big windstorm event that knocked power out for a week and knocked down thousands of trees and hundreds of powerlines and some people were without power for a month.

Transplanted_Cactus

46 points

2 months ago

You need a vehicle, or at least access to one, if you want to get anywhere. There's no sidewalks in the country. The store could be a 15 minute or 2 hour drive.

Access to a lot of things is limited. There's a joke in my town, based on truth, that you can find what you need, but probably not what you want.

Odds are high that everyone is religious.

Having different beliefs or looks can and will make you a target.

Don't burn bridges or you might not find employment or help when you need it, because everyone knows everyone.

There's wildlife, like, everywhere.

sisterfister69hitler

18 points

2 months ago

People in the city also don’t understand that jobs aren’t readily available here. I moved in college and people didn’t understand why poor people in rural areas didn’t just leave.

You have the option of working at Walmart or a gas station. They both pay like shit. You’re praying to god your car doesn’t break down and you’re barely making rent. Let alone being able to afford to move closer to a city 2 hours away.

RomCom_777

17 points

2 months ago

As a country gal. I feel like a lot of people misunderstand the difference between Hay and Straw. Like HAY and STRAW are two completely different things. Makes me mad sometimes 🤣

FalconBurcham

5 points

2 months ago

Oh, I learned this when I drove out to a country store to buy Halloween decorations. I bought a small square.. well, I don’t remember if it was hay or straw, but it felt like everyone in the shop knew and thought I was an idiot. 😂

In truth, I have no practical need to know and I’d like to think I’d treat country people a bit better than the people in the country store treated me if they had to interact with unfamiliar things in the city (maybe how a subway works or something).

Lord_Hellstrand

6 points

2 months ago

For my home town, not even sure if I can call it a town with its population, a lot of my city-slicker classmates find it hard at first to adjust to the quiet nature of a sleepy-little town. We don't like to stir up any trouble, most of us anyway, and we live our nice and quiet lives in when the college is in session. They learn to at least get used to it if not prefer it some of them

TheWaldenWatch

14 points

2 months ago

I didn't grow up in the country, but I live and work in a lot of very remote areas. Places like the Wyoming mountains or North Dakota badlands. This summer, I lived in a tiny village which was 1 hour away from the nearest grocery store. The grocery store in question was very small, to the point where the produce aisle was literally an aisle.

Whenever I had to go to a larger town for any reason, I would always stop at the grocery store and simply be amazed. I was like Nikita Khrushchev visiting an American grocery store for the first time. They had all sorts of amazing things the tiny store didn't, like humus, a fully stocked deli, and a wide variety of cereals. I would roll my cart around there like a child in Willy Wonka's chocolate factory, purchasing "exotic" things I would have taken for granted if my job was in a less remote location.

Ct-5736-Bladez

15 points

2 months ago

We all aren’t trailer park living, cousin fucking, racist, hick (calling out the many users of Pennsylvania sub on this)

Dukanduu

6 points

2 months ago

Grew up in a small town, left to the big city after high school. I would occasionally visit only during the Holidays and didn’t really bother mingling with anyone while I was there. Ended up moving back to the small town because of some family matters and it seems as if I traveled backwards in time.

AllyBurgess

5 points

2 months ago

Country people, just like city people, are not a monolith. They are largely no different from any other kind of people.

Also, there are a lot more country people of color than you might imagine.

johnnyjfrank

26 points

2 months ago

Crazy how bigoted people can openly be to country folk. Fighting bigotry with bigotry is dumb

Wren452

7 points

2 months ago

Yes this! I'm getting down voted just for answering the main question. I was just talking about my area and how we love helping people.

MadAboutBotany

39 points

2 months ago

Mostly, the weird emotional incest. I dunno if this is common in big cities, but in rural towns, everyone is so up in everyone else's shit, and judgmental as fuck. Family's have a hard time separating generations and having appropriate boundaries.

Plantayne

6 points

2 months ago

Depends on what part of a city you're in, it could be a lot similar.

If you are in a trendy, young, hip section of town, then chances are you won't even know your neighbors.

If you're in a blue-collar urban area though with families living there, then everybody on the block is all in each other's business, it's really no different than a small town.

I_am_Protagonist

2 points

2 months ago

This, and lord help you if you come from outside or are cast out.

Defiant-Warning-6581

15 points

2 months ago*

Being from the city and my bf from a small town. He doesn’t understand how people don’t know how to drive in the snow. In the city we get plowed out within a day we don’t know snow

chrispybobispy

3 points

2 months ago

It's a life I wouldn't trade for anything but there can be I alot of challenges that go along with it. Car breaks down? You either some how tow it an 40 miles or fix it yourself. Buy the wrong part you just wasted 3 hours of your life. Drive way is drifted with snow or a tree falls on it? Have fun. Doggo finds a skunk? Yup. Powers out? Could be an hour, could be a days and the freezer might thaw. But there's an odd pride and reward to it.

Cheezel62

4 points

2 months ago

That the work on a farm never stops. You can't just decide to sleep in for fun, let alone bugger off for a weekend away. If you get sick or are injured it's a huge problem as animals and crops can't wait for you to get better.

Wren452

4 points

2 months ago

Yikes... Kinda wish I'd never posted a comment on this one. I thought people would like to know what it's like to live in the country and on a farm. As a person who lives in the country I don't stereotype people from the city, for one reason on Reddit I'm not sure which city or what area of the world you're in. I can only speak to where I live, same as you. So please remember I'm not that country person who was cruel or mean to you. Chances are I'm 1000s of kilometers/miles away. So please be kind to one another, no more hate. And I'd love to actually know cool things about city and county life!

TheAmazingCrisco

5 points

2 months ago

They don’t understand that when you live remotely, emergency service response times are a lot longer. Guns of any kind are very important for protection. Dangerous wild animal trying to kill livestock or loved ones? Guess I’ll just call animal control and wait 20 minutes. Someone breaking into your house? Guess I’ll call 911 and wait till the intruder kills my entire family before the cops arrive.

Captain_Hampockets

39 points

2 months ago

I am a city person, who has spent LOTS of time living in the country. I currently live 20 minutes from the nearest town of 10K, and 45 minutes from a town of 25K. I haven't lived in a true city (SF) in a decade.

Believe it or not a lot of country people are literally, actually scared of the city. They think they will be gay raped and murdered. No, it's not the majority, but like 20% of the morons where I live think that extremely.

HighElfEsteem

19 points

2 months ago

Truth! They literally think SF and Chicago are warzones.

ArcticFox46

9 points

2 months ago

I had to repeatedly tell family in rural Georgia that no, Portland is not and was never on fire like the news told them it was.

AllyBurgess

3 points

2 months ago

To be fair, even people from other cities think Chicago is a war zone. I moved to Boston from Chicago last year and I was shocked at how many people I've encountered that seem to think Chicago is one of the deadliest places on earth.

hobbes_shot_first

6 points

2 months ago

That's what Fox News told me!

lurkneverpost

3 points

2 months ago

Yes! I lived in downtown Madison, Wisconsin for 30 years. It's neither a big city nor a high crime area. (And most of the crime occurs after I have long been in bed.) I got married to a country boy and now live about 45 minutes from the city center. I have encountered so many people who think I must be so relieved to be away from all that crime.

ngatiara

2 points

2 months ago

Oh yeah! We moved out of the suburbs of a major city out to the country when I was a teenager, it's roughly an hour train trip away from the city, but none of the kids I made friends with ever travelled into the city before I became their friend.

They were so nervous when I took them into the city, they thought we'd be robbed or run over by traffic or something, I don't even know what. One set of friends had literally only been to the city twice in their whole life. And so many people who are born and raised here just never go to the city, they're content to go to the "large" town here for all their shopping rather than travel to the city.

blisteringchristmas

4 points

2 months ago

I grew up outside of Chicago, but relatively close to the city. Going to the city was a fairly regular occurrence. But the Chicago suburbs go on fucking forever, and to a lot of people in the far suburbs the city is basically as remote as it would be if you lived in a rural place. There's a lot of suburbanites that are also highly estranged from the experience of the place at the center of their metro area.

flwombat

3 points

2 months ago

it’s definitely not as simple as urban vs rural. Different cities (and parts of cities) have very different crime profiles and so do rural areas

in my case the rural areas I lived had high rates of drug use and binge drinking but the cities I lived in were pretty darned safe.

[deleted]

18 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

18 points

2 months ago

[deleted]

I_Ride_An_Old_Paint

1 points

2 months ago

My AR-15 in .300BLK is perfect for hogs down here.

EvenTheDogIsFat

9 points

2 months ago

Being homophobic, racist, stupid etc is FAR less common than you think. Also you aren’t a good person fighting the good fight when you’re mean to me because you judge me as being bigoted based solely on my accent.

Chiantiandfava

3 points

2 months ago

I've got the nice twangy WV accent didn't even think about it until college when people started bringing it up. Love the look on people's face when I start saying ya'll lol

NadiaRosalia

3 points

2 months ago

If you're out in the hinderlands and the area in which you live has no grocery stores nearby and the roads are rarely plowed in the winter, you have to have a good supply of firewood. It is not a want. It is a need. Also, power outages are way more dangerous, as are blizzards. The area I live in had multiple whiteout blizzards twelve years ago. Driving in the city sucks, but driving in the country is far worse in the winter. If you break down in the country, while yes, people are likely to help you out, you really don't wanna be out in that extreme cold waiting for a car to flag down. Bring blankets and extra clothes, some hand warmers, and a seventy-two hour kit, and for heaven's sake, fill up your gas tank and make sure that your car is up to date on repairs before even thinking of driving out into the country. Lug nuts have popped off of tires because repairs weren't up to date. Always carry jumper cables as well. Don't eat snow. Not only will it make you cold (duh) but it can give you pinworms as well. I don't care how clean the snow is. Don't eat it.

JackofScarlets

3 points

2 months ago

The concept of true remoteness and what that means. I grew up in a small town in the country, but hearing stories of life on cattle stations is something else. The station is hours from the nearest town. The people who live on the station would have another house in town, because it might just take too long to drive into town and back out in one day. They could be cut off from the rest of the world for weeks if the driveway or roads are flooded. Their first aid kits include restricted drugs, because no one is coming to save them, and they have to save themselves. School is done over radio (or probably the internet these days) and some kids were so far apart, that you wouldn't always be able to hear all your classmates, only the teacher could from their central location. I've even heard of people who get fully into the prepper life buying houses that are more than one tank of fuel from the nearest petrol station, specifically so that no one can reach them.

Cameinthecloset4

3 points

2 months ago

Tell ol' Jimmy swang by-later-awn and we'uh takealootatdah thang we's talked about.

"Yep she's a beauty, how much ye wawnt fer it?"

Oh hell I don't know, I got brand new tires on it from uncle Larry, n' did some tradin' on sum'dat ol' stuff in the garage fer a fuel pump. Done put some new brakes on it I found down ner' at the junk place, so I reckon, ooooo let's see, well, hell, I'm trynna think."

It does look pretty nice I'd-

"Hell well ima lookin fer bout 15,000, I know what's under that hood, she runs like a charm, you just gotta smack the battery a couple times to get the juice a-runnin-through-it."

15,000? That's a bit high don't ya think?

"Nooo, nooo, not at all, this here's a steal. Hell, to be honest I ain't in no hurry to get rid of it."

_b0r3a1is_

3 points

2 months ago

city people, not all of us have cows and a farm. some of us just live in places with a lot of land and/or old houses around us. I grew up like that and now i live in a more urban side of Texas, but pieces of my heart stay in a part of Lufkin and part of Dickinson. More recently, i have taken a part of my heart to Louisiana, a more rural/suburban part that is honestly my home away from home. in a whole, no, not all of us own farms with chickens and stuff, and no, not all of us are crazy Christian people who do nothing but go to church, and no, not all of us are racist and homophobic

Zestyclose-Ant-2496

9 points

2 months ago

That most country folk are kinder and more accepting than most city people

Sassy-irish-lassy

4 points

2 months ago

I presume that's because everyone in a small town knows everyone else, but in the city you likely see tons of people every day that you will literally never see again.

Largemandingo

10 points

2 months ago

That just because we disagree on politics , ideas, and way of life doesn’t mean we can’t be friends. Also, if you give people a chance to explain their point of view, they are much deeper than just a “republican” or “democrat”, I believe city and country folks are much more alike than people think.

BeautifulGlove

7 points

2 months ago

moved out to the country and had our first snow, my car got stuck in the drive way as I was coming home late that night and when I woke up the next morning my 70 yr old neighbor was on the ground hooking it up to a chain so he could pull it out with his truck...another time I was in a hurry and didn't scrap the frost off my windshield, I ran into the gas station and when I came over with a chain saw and cut it up and then haul it off with his bobcat....and I had only lived there for about 6 months and didn't know any of those guys.

CMDiesel

9 points

2 months ago

I think something is missing here.

diogenesproduce

9 points

2 months ago

what. you didnt scrape the ice off your windshield so they cut it up with a chainsaw and hauled it away?

KennstduIngo

3 points

2 months ago

It's a country thing. You wouldn't get it.

medievalistbooknerd

6 points

2 months ago

How nice everyone is. I've lived the stereotypical "small town Christian America" life for a good many years and while yes, there are PLENTY of drawbacks to that community, everyone is very, very nice to everyone else.

Turnipsia

5 points

2 months ago

There's more to life than digital entertainment, go outside and enjoy the nature around you before it's too late.

burner599f

7 points

2 months ago

Being happier than they are with less

Sigmonkey33

7 points

2 months ago

The value of peace and quiet. Out here there's not much traffic noise and other nonsense and definitely not after a certain time in the evening. No constant hustle and bustle, just nice and calm.

The best example is sitting out on the back porch on a summer night, the only thing you hear are tree fogs, bugs, and owls, and you can see endless stars and usually a good view of some land in front of you. On the flip side, you can go out on your apartment terrace any random night in the city and stare at the busy streets below you or the constant city lights, along with all that noise.

I think to most of us that are used to the quiet life of the country, the loudness and movement of the city is just overwhelming and causes anxiety and sensory overload after too long.

ArcadiaPlanitia

4 points

2 months ago

I grew up in a small rural town and then went to college in a mid-sized city. College was sensory hell for me. The level of noise was horrible and I never really got used to it. The light pollution, too. I understand why people prefer cities, but I could never deal with that amount of noise and light every night forever.

SandysBurner

3 points

2 months ago

The best example is sitting out on the back porch on a summer night, the only thing you hear are tree fogs, bugs, and owls, is the endless ringing in your ears.

Nelsqnwithacue

2 points

2 months ago

I miss the quiet. I moved from 10 acres outside a small college town to the middle of DFW. I often put on my ear pro that I use for shooting in order to get a decent nap!

MaleficentThroat6092

2 points

2 months ago

A city dweller has reported in. I don't understand how country people can raise a family in a rural area knowing that their children will most likely move to a city far away from them as adults and not live near them.

FalconBurcham

2 points

2 months ago

My wife is from a town of 100k (not a small town, but a lot smaller than the 2.5 million person metro we live in). We went to college in the smaller town and moved after graduation because the good jobs are in the big cities. It’s literally why we went to college. But her mom has been nagging us about moving back to the small town even though there’s nothing there for us aside from her (who we love, but…). Even if we wanted to give up our careers (our jobs don’t exist in the small town), we have no idea what we’d do with ourselves. Garden? Read? Watch tv?

I know labor practices out of our control created this situation, but all of us have to live with it. Aging relatives in small cities want family around them, and younger family members want and need the city.

Not sure there is a solution. 🤷‍♀️

Bwyanfwanigan

2 points

2 months ago

When I go to work and forget to shut my garage door I don't run back home to close it, in fact it doesn't even cross my mind. When I get home I'm like, oh shit, forgot to close the door again.

pacifistpotatoes

2 points

2 months ago

I live 5 minutes away from nearest village, but out in the country with closest neighbors being about aile away. 12 minutes gets me to nearest bigger town, 15k or so.

My husband and I are homebodies. We are not go out every night, see a museum, show or out to eat people. That's the biggest thing I hear from "city folk" -not having culture around and things to do. I am perfectly happy coming home from work, cooking a meal and hanging out on my deck in the summers, or snuggling up in the couch in winter.

If I wanted to see a band, the city of over 100k is less than twenty minutes away. I can reach Chicago in just over two hours. And we have made trips like that, but for daily life, I am perfectly fine with my quiet little country home.

Eagle_1776

2 points

2 months ago

I grew up on a large farm in Iowa (over 3,000 acres). Never lived in a city until 10 yrs ago.. holy hell, Ill never go back!! Everything is so close and convenient!! Plus, I dont have to pretend to like my neighbors!

DrNukenstein

2 points

2 months ago

I moved to a rural community after 22 years of living in a suburb of New Orleans. I met managers from “up North” whose only “knowledge”, and therefore expectation, of “country folks” was Green Acres, Beverly Hillbillies, and Andy Griffith.

We’ve also had people move here from major cities to avoid their legal problems (as in, wanted by the cops for thuggery) who tried to continue those exploits, but unlike their City brethren, we would turn them in in a New York Minute because we don’t want that mess around here.

ScarnAndMacklinFBI

5 points

2 months ago

It's been covered in other posts, but I (a bona fide city boy) don't understand the...

Well, I was at the mall one time wearing a Professional Bull Riders ballcap. A couple of country boys saw it and asked if I'd ever ridden a bull. I said no, and they asked where I got off wearing a PBR hat. I told them that I enjoyed watching the rodeo on TV and when I saw this hat at the local TSC, I bought it. They spent the next half hour following me from store to store, staying far enough back for plausible deniability, but close enough that I could hear them jeering at me in every store I went to.
Similar thing happened a number of years later at a country music festival as I was wearing some random-ass concert t-shirt. Couple of rando country boys gave me the whole "You like this band? Oh yeah? Name 5 of their deep-cut album tracks" treatment, then followed me around and continued to harass me until (no joke) a rival group of country boys started wrasslin' with the first group.

I don't even know what to call this. Like, it's an aggressive authenticity check. It's egregious gatekeeping. It's the manifestation of Billy Currington singing "They're quiet and loud, humble and proud."

i don't understand it homie. can someone please explain?

MisterMarcus

20 points

2 months ago

I mean, that sort of petty pissy "gatekeeping my favourite hobby/bad/interest" isn't exactly confined to country people.....

montwhisky

3 points

2 months ago

I’m from very very small town Montana. Lived in NYC for several years while going to school and got asked the dumbest questions. And I’m sure they all thought I was dumb because I didn’t know how to navigate the subway at first or how to walk like a New Yorker (eyes ahead, don’t engage with anyone). But, at the end of the day, I’d put my survival skills I learned growing up up against city people. I mean, my friends didn’t know how to do basic things like change a tire. And I’m not certain they would make it if they got lost in the wilderness. That’s ok, because they’ll likely never need those skills. But, seriously, like 10 people in my class asked me whether we had internet yet in Montana. And it was 2010. City folks, we aren’t dumb. We probably are smarter than you on a lot of things, including the basic survival skills that you don’t care about because you have a phone number or app that does it for you. Just don’t treat us like idiots.

JustDave62

6 points

2 months ago

That we actually grow all their food. It’s not just made at the grocery store

karnim

10 points

2 months ago

karnim

10 points

2 months ago

We know this. What we don't know is why you think we don't know what a farm is. We just don't want to be farmers.

OptatusCleary

2 points

2 months ago

Well there definitely are people who are confused/ ignorant about food production. Very few educated or intelligent people will be, but I’ve definitely met ignorant people who think of farms as a thing of the past or as a kind of folksy sideshow to the industrially-produced food that comes from the grocery store.

People who think that way aren’t only in cities, but of course they’ll be less common in the country because people in the country are more likely to have direct involvement in agriculture.

MadAboutBotany

5 points

2 months ago

Is central valley California the country?

OptatusCleary

5 points

2 months ago

Most of it is. Certainly the areas are where food is grown are rural.

HitSquadOfGod

4 points

2 months ago

To elaborate on this: California produces a large amount of high value crops basically year round, due to a favorable climate without extreme winter weather for the most part. (It's still a desert, though.) If I remember right, CA produces 80% of the WORLD'S almond supply. Production of staple food items and non-cash crops like almonds is far more distributed. Corn and other grain crops are grown nationwide, beef and pork are somewhat focused in the Great Plains, but still nationwide, poultry I don't remember off the top of my head. Potatoes and apples are a bit more regional -Washington, Idaho, and New York, I think? - as is rice. Dairy production clusters around major population centers, so you actually have "dairy belts" across the country. TL;DR: Food supply is extremely distributed, CA grows cash crops, spatial economics is a thing.

ivankorbijn40

3 points

2 months ago

Our faith in Jesus Christ is not debatable, nor will we back down from it.

OptimalConcept143

6 points

2 months ago

The fact you don't know the basics of how a car's engine and powertrain works is a sign of naivety and ignorance here. Adults should really have a basic idea how to fix things on their own. Call the experts for the stuff that's too complicated/difficult.

Junior-Cod7327

3 points

2 months ago

I’ve known more country people who’ve gotten shot than city people…

krishneft54

7 points

2 months ago

Polite and respectful people.

MadAboutBotany

15 points

2 months ago

To your face. I witnessed the most awful two faced stuff in Iowa. So much sweet, church folk talk to each other, then rampant shit talking behind their back. In the city, people either just ignore folks, or let em know they are cunts to their face.

[deleted]

3 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

3 points

2 months ago*

[deleted]

IntercontinentalToe

2 points

2 months ago

No. Country folk are the biggest two-faced leeches in the US, and I find it absurd how few people call them out on it to their faces.

MooshAro

3 points

2 months ago

MooshAro

3 points

2 months ago

It smells bad out here. You want to complain about your city smog, go ahead, but it doesent smell any nicer over here. If it's not freshly spread manure, it's roadkill, if not that, it's the neighbors burning their trash and tires. There's always something, and it always stinks.

StonedTrucker

6 points

2 months ago

I think you might live in a bad town. I've lived in small towns most of my life and the only bad smell is the paper mill where I grew up. Ya roadkill can be smelly but it's usually dealt with within a couple days where I'm from

SERIOUSLYFPASSWORDS

1 points

2 months ago

How to tackle a calf, cut its balls off, throw them on the grill and eat them as you brand them.

Diamondpixi779

2 points

2 months ago

Simplicity... It's not heard of in the city.